It is currently Mon Dec 22, 2014 11:21 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours [ DST ]





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:09 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ystem-7896

Ranking the Falcons: The Scoring System
July 9th, 2013
Aaron Freeman

D. Orlando Ledbetter of the AJC is ranking the Top 25 Falcons. And I’m not ripping him off. To be honest, I have been wanting to do this since the NFL Network started their own Top 100 rankings. And frankly, Pat Yasinskas of ESPN started ranking the Top 25 players in the NFC South roughly three weeks ago, so if I’m ripping anybody off it’s probably him.

But I didn’t want to just rank players based off my opinion, I wanted to come up with a more scientific method for ranking players, and that took some time to come up with.

Originally, I just wanted to look at every player in the NFL, assign them a rough grade (1-100) and based off that determine whether Falcon players could start on other teams. But some positions require two starters, and the reality of the NFL is that it is rare for teams to have two really good starters at the same position. So I also wanted to factor whether Falcon players could go to the other 31 teams and not just start, but be the best player at their position group. I also wanted to factor whether they could also become a role player on their respective teams. And dependent on the position would determine what sort of role. For a quarterback, that meant being the No. 2 if not the starter. For a defensive end, that meant being no lower than the third guy in the rotation. For a wideout, it mean being the third or fourth guy. For an offensive tackle, that meant being the swing tackle and so on and so forth. Based off how many teams those players could start for, be the best of their position group, and be a role player for would determine one aspect of their grade, by adding them all together. For example, since Aaron Rodgers is who I consider to be the best quarterback in the league, he could start for, be the best player at, and a role player for all 32 teams, giving him a maximum grade of 96 (or 32 + 32 + 32). That number was then averaged with their player grade that I had assigned them earlier. For example, Rodgers earned a 99 out of 100, the best in the league, thus giving him an average score of 97.5.

That alone is probably good enough, but I also wanted to add in additional factors. I wanted to give players that were in the primes of their careers a bonus. So I looked at each position group and based off the caliber of player, I looked at what age they could be expected to see their peak production decline. For the case of a top-tier quarterback like Aaron Rodgers or Matt Ryan, that age I determined to be 38 years old, which largely resulted from the fact that was the age in which Brett Favre played his last snap in Green Bay and John Elway won his last Super Bowl in Denver. And based off their current age, that would determine how many years of peak production each player could have. And for every two years of peak production left, they were awarded one bonus point. If they had 10 or more years, that would result in a maximum of 5 bonus points. I didn’t penalize players that were beyond their peak years.

Another bonus was awarded based off the players position. For example, quarterback being the most important position received a 5-point bonus. A backup quarterback received a 4-point bonus. Other of the “pillar” positions (edge rusher, cornerback, and left tackle) also received 4-point bonuses. Every other position received 3 points, except kicker, punter, and fullback which each only received 2 points. I’m sure I probably could have conceived a better methodology for that, but I didn’t want to over-complicate things.

In the end, it was supposed to result in a score from 1-100 in which players could be ranked. Although league-wide, two players would have received scores that exceeded 100. Tom Brady would have received a score of 101, while Rodgers would have received a score of 105.

Instead of ranking the Top 25 Falcons players, I’m going to rank the Top 33. Why 33? Well, several of the players that finished outside the Top 25 I think are interesting and worth discussing. So I picked 33 simply because the first player that I felt was worthy of mention is in fact the 33rd-ranked player on the team. Like D-Led, I’ll be posting a new player every day, counting down to No. 1.






http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... aquoi-7898

Ranking the Falcons: No. 33 Jonathan Massaquoi
July 9th, 2013
Aaron Freeman

Daniel Shirey-US PRESSWIRE
Jonathan Massaquoi

If you haven’t read the methodology for the scoring system I came up with, you should check that out right now by clicking here.

The 33rd-ranked player on the list is defensive end Jonathan Massaquoi.

Total Score: 35


Player Grade: 49 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 0 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 0 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 7 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +4

As you can see, I gave Massaquoi a fairly good player grade, ranking roughly average league-wide. But the issue for him is that he is largely untested, so it’s hard to see him being a significant role player on a number of other teams that have more tested and proven players in their defensive end rotation. While Massaquoi also would have the added bonus of potentially being able to play outside linebacker for a number of 3-4 teams elsewhere in the league, he would simply be a backup and unlike most 4-3 teams, most 3-4 teams don’t feature a heavy rotation at outside linebacker. Thus his role would be largely riding the pine for them.

Massaquoi is a player that has potential, but at this point because he’s only in his second year in the league and hasn’t really showcased that potential yet on the field so he can’t really receive a higher grade. His grade is also hurt slightly from the fact that he’s already 25 years old, and the peak potential for a non-elite edge rusher appears to be around age 32. That means the Falcons still have the potential to get another 7 years of strong production from him if he does develop.

Massaquoi impressed me as a sophomore at Troy, where he looked to be a dynamic edge rusher. But he added muscle his junior season and got up to around 260 pounds and just didn’t play with the same burst and explosion. He’s currently listed at 264 pounds, and the hope is that he is now more suited to carrying that weight. He’ll be counted upon to be a significant part of the Falcons pass rush rotation as he heads into training camp expecting to be the team’s third option behind starters Osi Umenyiora and Kroy Biermann. He should get into the mix in nickel situations, although he’s going to have to be exceptional to pull either starter off the field on a consistent basis. But Massaquoi can at the very least make his bones on special teams, where he was surprisingly solid last year once he started to getting reps there following the release of Ray Edwards.

In the end, I think the Falcons envision him being the top candidate to replace Osi two years from now if he can continue to progress and develop. Whether he turns into a double-digit sack guy will be a tall order, but if he develops into a player that can at least garner 6-8 sacks a season will be a major win for the Falcons. Of the Falcons backup defensive ends, I think he possesses the most potential to develop into a reliable contributor if not a starter.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Ranking the Falcons: No. 32 Levine Toilolo
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:11 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ilolo-7906

Ranking the Falcons: No. 32 Levine Toilolo
July 10th, 2013
Aaron Freeman

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY
Levine Toilolo
Once again, for the uninitiated, here is the scoring system I conceived for this endeavor.

The 32nd-ranked Falcons player is rookie tight end Levine Toilolo.

Total Score: 37

Player Grade: 48 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 1 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 8 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +5
Positional Bonus: +3

Like the 33rd ranked player, Jonathan Massaquoi, Toilolo is untested. But he was an underrated tight end prospect from this past year’s class. He possesses good size, speed, and blocking potential. And he is helped by the fact that the Oakland Raiders tight end situation is so bad that he would likely enter the season atop their depth chart if he was donning the silver and black. As a player that also can function as a No. 2 blocker, he also could find a role on a quarter of teams league-wide.

Toilolo is going to be an interesting player to watch this year. The Falcons expect him to be the backup to Tony Gonzalez this year. His primary role will be to block in the run game. But unlike past Falcon backups like Michael Palmer, he actually has potential to impact in the passing game due to his physical tools. With his long 6-8 frame, he’ll be a tough matchup for opposing defenders.

But of course like every Falcon receiver not named Quintorris, Sharod, or Anthony, he’s probably going to struggle to get targets because of the three aforementioned players being so good. Even in Michael Palmer’s best season, he was only targeted 16 times. Even if Toilolo is able to double that, that likely only results in an upward potential of 20 catches this year.

Really it’s all about the long-term potential of Toilolo. He’ll be considered the first option in 2014 to replace Gonzalez. And the fact that he has the potential to impact as a blocker gives him added longevity in this league as even average blocking tight ends tend to have longer careers than your average receiving tight end. That means Toilolo could play for another decade in Atlanta. If you were asking me to place a bet on how that decade would be spent, I’d probably wager that it will be serving as a dual tight end akin to Ed Dickson in Baltimore. Dickson is primarily a blocker and occasionally a weapon in the passing game but is clearly outshined by Dennis Pitta in the latter arena. The difference is that I think from a physical standpoint, Toilolo has greater upside than Dickson, so I’m at least optimistic that he could become a key asset for the Falcons moving forward.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Ranking the Falcons: No. 31 Harry Douglas
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:11 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... uglas-7913

Ranking the Falcons: No. 31 Harry Douglas
July 11th, 2013
Aaron Freeman

AP Photo
Harry Douglas
Check out the scoring system here. The 31st-ranked Falcon player is wide receiver Harry Douglas.

Total Score: 42

Player Grade: 51 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 3 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 0 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 22 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +1
Positional Bonus: +3

Douglas is one of the reasons why I chose not to limit this ranking system to 25 players. The fact that he finished outside the Top 30 was even a surprise to me. His player grade is fairly high, being tied for 21st on the team, but he’s simply hurt by the fact that there are a plethora of equally good or better receivers elsewhere in the league.

And the primary reason for that is that Douglas’ skillset is fairly limited. While he’s very quick and explosive, making him the prototype for the traditional NFL slot receiver, less and less NFL teams are using that types of players in the slot nowadays. And simply put, there just seem to be more receivers out there that are simply better at it than Douglas, e.g. Andrew Hawkins, Tavon Austin, Jacoby Ford, and Doug Baldwin just to name a few. Now it may be the case that several of those players outshine Douglas because they are not surrounded with the cast of receivers that Douglas finds himself with here in Atlanta. It’s probably easier for a player like Hawkins to shine when he’s competing for targets against Mohamed Sanu and Jermaine Gresham rather than Roddy White and Tony Gonzalez.

What helps Douglas’ case is the fact that his production has increased over the past two years when Julio Jones has been absent from the lineup and HD has been asked to fill in. The problem is that when not in those circumstances, Douglas is fairly middling. He’ll make his presence known from time to time, with notable big plays late in games (last year’s win over Seattle and the 2011 OT loss to the Saints being prominent examples), but it’s not consistent week in and week out.

Douglas is not a player that is a “man beater” that is going to simply go out there and separate easily from most starting-caliber corners like White and Jones do regularly. He’s a smaller guy and his catch radius is much smaller than those two as well. That makes the windows smaller for Matt Ryan to throw into and it’s one of the reasons why Douglas’ production dips significantly when he’s running routes that go more than 10 yards downfield. And if you’re in Ryan’s shoes, and you have to choose between the relatively large windows presented by White, Jones, and Gonzalez or the smaller one from Douglas, it becomes a very easy choice to steer away from No. 83.

Another deficiency for Douglas is his age. He’s nearly 29 years old, and receivers of his ilk start tend to reach the end of their rope at or before age 32 (see Dennis Northcutt or Nate Burleson). That doesn’t make for a great recipe for success moving forward with him, in that his body is going to start to decline while the Falcons are looking for ways to boost his production.

This means that Douglas needs help from the play caller. With a year under his belt, perhaps 2013 is the year that Dirk Koetter figures out how to use him better. He found ways to make Mike Thomas shine in Jacksonville, who is similarly an undersized player. Douglas is at his best on shorter routes designed to get him open quickly, akin to slot receivers like Wes Welker and Danny Amendola. In the past, I think the Falcons have not used this ability to its greatest potential, especially given their inability to run the ball consistently. Douglas used in this manner could help curb that deficiency, replacing a lot of the 2 and 3-yard runs on first downs with 5 and 6-yard receptions instead.

All in all, Douglas can be described as a solid, but fairly one-note player that plays in an offense that really isn’t suited to accentuated that single note like a player like Welker was in New England. Douglas could go to most NFL teams and offer similar if not greater production off the bench than he does here in Atlanta. But unless he can start to produce at a more consistent level, it’s probably not as many teams as one initially believes. It certainly wasn’t when I started ranking receivers. I just look at a player like Eddie Royal and don’t see much difference between him and HD. And Royal is the sixth most talented receiver on the San Diego Chargers roster behind Malcom Floyd, Danario Alexander, Keenan Allen, Vincent Brown, and Robert Meachem. There are just more teams like that where Douglas would likely struggle to distinguish himself from the bunch and thus why he ranks so low on the Falcons.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Ranking the Falcons: No. 30 Jason Snelling
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:39 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... lling-7917

Ranking the Falcons: No. 30 Jason Snelling
July 12th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Edit No comments
AP Photo/Phil Coale

Jason Snelling

Click here to read the scoring system to understand why running back Jason Snelling finishes 30th among Falcons players.
Total Score: 42


Player Grade: 49 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 1 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 27 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +0
Positional Bonus: +3

Jason Snelling could probably head to the St. Louis Rams and start over either Daryl Richardson or Isaiah Pead. But he could find a role on the majority of NFL teams nowadays, as teams don’t simply just use two running backs but now many are using three in their committee-driven systems.

Snelling isn’t a flashy player, but what you really like about him is that he’s really the ideal role player. He doesn’t excel at anything, but whatever you ask of him he can do. If you want him to run the ball, he’s effective. He’s a good receiver as well out of the backfield. He’s solid in pass protection. He also is a capable lead blocker when the Falcons have used him over the years when Ovie Mughelli has been out of the lineup. While Mike Cox filled in ably last year once the Lousaka Polite experiment was deemed a failure, the truth is that the Falcons probably could have simply gotten away with Snelling filling in the rest of the way. He also is an underrated special teams player.

Hell, I’d bet if the Falcons wanted Snelling to line up at tight end/H-back or at slot receiver, he’d be functional there. Versatility is the key with Snelling, and it’s why at age 29 (a year beyond his peak age) he still is going to have a significant role with the team and could probably continue to do so for another few years beyond 2013 if the Falcons so wished it.

What prevents Snelling from being higher on this list is that in his primary role: as someone that carries the football, he’s decidedly average when compared to most running backs in the league. That’s not mean to be as negative as it sounds. Snelling is average (or slightly above) across the board when it comes to the skills that running backs require to succeed in the NFL such as footwork, burst, balance, speed, lateral agility, and power. That makes him a well-rounded player, but essentially he becomes the jack of all trades and the master of none. That leaves him at a disadvantage compared to many other NFL running backs that excel in at least one of those areas. But it makes him perfect for his role in Atlanta because of the aforementioned ability to fit into a number of roles and niches with the team.

As for his 2013 outlook, Snelling is probably not going to get a ton of work offensively because of the Falcons upgrade to the starting position with the acquisition of Steven Jackson, and the fact that No. 2 tailback Jacquizz Rodgers is one of those players that does excel in a few areas (lateral agility being the primary one). He only finished with 18 carries for the year, a third of which came in garbage time against the Giants. But he really took advantage of those limited reps, particularly in that game, and the same will be expected for him in 2013. He did catch 31 passes last year, but that figure probably will decline due to the presence of Jackson.

A way for Snelling to increase his value will be improving on special teams. He’s been no slouch there over the years, collecting 36 tackles in six seasons. Last year, he had 6 stops, the second-best mark of his career after a team-leading 19-tackle effort in 2008. If he has another year of production like that in him, then it will more than make up for any decline on offense.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Ranking the Falcons: No. 29 Akeem Dent
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:53 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... -dent-7964

Ranking the Falcons: No. 29 Akeem Dent
July 13th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Edit No comments
US PRESSWIRE

Akeem Dent

To see how this scoring system was devised, you can click here. The 29th-ranked Falcon player is middle linebacker Akeem Dent.
Total Score: 43

Player Grade: 52 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 6 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 0 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 16 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +3

Full disclosure, I wasn’t a fan of the selection of Dent in the third round back in 2011. While, I was disappointed with what the Falcons gave up in the Julio Jones trade that year, I at least knew that Jones was a great NFL prospect and my favorite wide receiver prospect since Larry Fitzgerald came out seven years before. In the case of Dent, I wasn’t convinced that he was more than a late round prospect that was a career backup. Taking him in the third round seemed like the most grievous of Dimitroff’s mid-round reaches. His play in 2012 did not inspire with much confidence that my initial assessment of him was wrong.

Dent is a player that I’m expecting to improve this year, but I’m just not sure by how much. I believe much of his struggles in 2012 came from his lack of experience and the fact that he was playing too much on his heels. He was thinking too much rather than simply reacting, something that comes with experience.

So it seems odd to say but 2013 might be a make or break season for Dent. I don’t expect him to come out and become one of the league’s best linebacker, but he does need to make significant improvement. Otherwise the Falcons are going to be in a position next off-season where they might have to look at replacing him as their middle linebacker. I’ve spoken before about the possibility that Dent could potentially move to strongside linebacker in 2014 as a potential replacement for Nicholas, who will be 31 and count $4 million against the 2014 salary cap.

Dent’s ranking is largely due to the fact that a number of NFL teams are also going with young and unproven players at middle linebacker, e.g. Denver and Buffalo, and the same for some 3-4 teams such as the New York Jets, Cleveland, and Houston. But without a significant improvement this year, Dent would rank as a quality backup for the majority of NFL teams similar to players such as Dan Connor, Tim Dobbins, and Chase Blackburn. Those are players that have started games in this league (combined 85 since 2005), but very few teams have counted on them year after year to be starters. Instead, they are seen more as journeyman stopgaps. Dobbins had already joined his third team by his sixth season, and Connor just joined his third this past off-season in now his sixth season. Without significant improvement from Dent this year, his career path could easily go down that road.

But going well for Dent is his youth and the fact that even if that is all his career amounts to be, then like those players he can still make a nice NFL career and potentially play 8-10 years and be a solid contributor.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Ranking the Falcons: No. 28 Bradie Ewing
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:10 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ewing-7966

Ranking the Falcons: No. 28 Bradie Ewing
July 14th, 2013 Aaron Freeman No comments
Dale Zanine-US PRESSWIRE

Bradie Ewing

Here is the scoring system and now it’s time to look at the 28th-ranked player in fullback Bradie Ewing.
Total Score: 44

Player Grade: 49 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 11 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 5 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 11 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +4
Positional Bonus: +2

Ewing is a relative unknown after tearing his ACL on the first special teams play of last summer’s preseason opener. He never played a snap on offense before going down with the injury. Now, he’ll be counted back to come back in 2013 stronger than ever and be a contributor as a Falcons starter.

Fullback is a dying position in the NFL, but Ewing should still be able to carve out a fine career in Atlanta and potentially elsewhere in the league.

Ewing is not a road-grading fullback in the way that he’s going to blow up linebackers at the line of scrimmage, a common sight during the heyday of Ovie Mughelli in Atlanta. But he can still be a capable lead blocker. At Wisconsin, he was very consistent when it came to locating and hitting his assignments, which makes him more efficient than impactful per se. The Falcons won’t rely on the fullback position as much this year and presumably moving forward as they did in the past. Gone is the ground and pound staple of the offense with Mughelli and Michael Turner. While the Falcons won’t shy away from running the ball, it won’t be the bread and butter of their offense. Instead, they are building the offense around quarterback Matt Ryan and largely your value on offense is based around how effectively you can make him better.

Ewing won’t contribute there as much as others like Julio Jones, Tony Gonzalez, Jacquizz Rodgers, and Steven Jackson obviously, but he can still contribute. A capable receiver, the big key for him is to become proficient in pass protection. That means he can get reps when the Falcons spread the field and go with four wideouts, a role that Mughelli occasionally held. If you can trust your fullback to keep your quarterback’s jersey clean and allow your other backs to get a rest, that adds increased value. That impact in the passing game was something that the Falcons missed last year with Mike Cox. While Cox was a capable blocker, his limitations in the passing game made him less valuable, and thus why the Falcons are more willing to turn the keys over to Ewing.

Another area where Ewing is expected to carve out a significant role will be on special teams. He was able there at Wisconsin. Cox also added limited value in that realm.

So while Ewing may not develop into the next Mughelli or Vonta Leach, he won’t really have to in order to make a home on this roster moving forward. If he’s only competent (and I think he has the upside to be more than that) and can contribute occasionally in the passing game as well as special teams, he’ll have a chance to move up these rankings down the road.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:37 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... olmes-7999

Ranking the Falcons: No. 27 Lamar Holmes
July 15th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Edit Leave a comment Go to comments
Dale Zanine-US PRESSWIRE

Lamar Holmes

Let’s check out the 27th-ranked player in offensive tackle Lamar Holmes. Click here to try and get a handle on the scoring system.
Total Score: 45

Player Grade: 48 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 5 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 0 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 23 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +4
Positional Bonus: +3

The Falcons see Holmes as the future at right tackle, although he’s currently embroiled in a battle with Mike Johnson for the starting spot here in Atlanta. History suggests that the player that enters camp as the starter will emerge from camp as the starter. That has been the case every year under Mike Smith when there has been a camp competition. The only possible exception would be Sam Baker “unseating” Quinn Ojinnaka during the 2008 camp. But that’s a stretch considering I don’t think the Falcons at any point that off-season or summer really thought Ojinnaka was a legit candidate to win the starting job. He was merely a placeholder until Baker was ready.

I thought Holmes was fairly raw when we drafted him a year ago. He looked to be the type of tackle that is normally taken in the fifth or sixth round because while he possesses starting potential, it’s probably going to take him the better part of three years before he can reach it. And typically, when it comes to players taken in the third round and earlier, you want that player starting and producing by the end of his second season at the latest. That is still a possibility with Holmes, but again if he doesn’t beat out Johnson this summer and spends another year as the swing tackle just affirms my post-draft assessment that the Falcons reached on him. But that reach doesn’t mean that he can’t eventually develop into a very good player for the team in 2014 and beyond. While Johnson might win the starting spot, his play this year will determine whether he gets a long-term deal after the season or not. If he doesn’t earn one, then the right tackle spot will certainly be Holmes’ job to lose come next season. And basically then Holmes will have two years to prove he’s worthy of a long-term deal in the hopes that he becomes the next Tyson Clabo or Todd Weiner-esque fixture at the spot.

Despite having only really played in one NFL game, Holmes ranks fairly high on the Falcons thanks in part to the fact that there are several weak right tackles in the league. And I believe Holmes despite his rawness could probably start for a number of NFL teams today, simply because he has more upside than some of these other starting right tackles. Holmes is also helped by the fact that he could easily be a swing tackle on the majority of NFL teams.

He possesses good size and athleticism for a man as big as he is. He’s much lighter on his feet that you’d expect at first glance. The key for Holmes is developing more power and explosiveness in his game. He was very lumbering and slow in his movements last summer. In his lone action last year in mop-up duty against the Giants, he appeared much quicker and explosive. That gives me hope that he’s improved in that regard. Size is an asset in the NFL, but if you cannot combine it with quickness, explosiveness, and power as an offensive lineman, then it really doesn’t count for much. Let’s hope this summer we see all of those things in Holmes’ game. If so, then he stands an excellent shot at breaking from history and being the first to win a starting spot outright upfront.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:37 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... awley-8002

Ranking the Falcons: No. 26 Joe Hawley
July 15th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Edit Leave a comment Go to comments
Icon SMI

Joe Hawley

After seeing another lineman at No. 27, guard/center Joe Hawley clocks in at No. 26 among Falcon players. Click here to see the scoring system used for these rankings.
Total Score: 45

Player Grade: 50 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 2 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 23 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +4
Positional Bonus: +3

While Hawley and Holmes wound up with the same overall score, I gave Hawley the nod in the rankings because his player grade is a bit higher. And that’s because unlike Holmes, we’ve seen quite a bit of Hawley to really gauge him as a player.

Hawley has filled in at both center and right guard. And while he was completely miscast at the latter spot in 2011, he was serviceable at points. The one positive you can say about Hawley as a guard is that it ultimately resulted in improved play from Tyson Clabo down the stretch. At the outset of 2011, I thought Hawley flashed potential as a fill-in starter at center for an injured Todd McClure.

Unlike Peter Konz, Hawley is probably more like McClure in his playing style. Hawley is more physical than McClure was at the pivot, and gets extra points for his mean streak. Without a doubt, Hawley is one of the “dirtiest” blockers I’ve ever seen. He routinely plays beyond the whistle, and he epitomized the “dirt bag” comments made back in 2011 by an opposing player.

Hawley is expected to compete for playing time this year, but really looks to be on the outside looking in. It would be a major upset at this point if Peter Konz didn’t start the year at center, which puts Hawley’s best avenue at right guard. But unless he’s dramatically improved his game from 2011, then it would be hard-pressed to see the Falcons employing him there over Garrett Reynolds or Mike Johnson should the latter lose his competition at right tackle.

Instead, Hawley should be relatively settled in as the swing guard/center that in the event of an injury to Konz, Reynolds, and/or Justin Blalock will be inserted into the lineup. Hawley is entering a contract year and how this season plays out will determine his future with the Falcons and in this league. There are a few teams that he could probably go to today and start at center and be an upgrade. The majority of NFL teams however, he’d likely serve the same function he does here in Atlanta, which is add depth.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 11:34 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... dgers-8332

Ranking the Falcons: No. 25 Jacquizz Rodgers
July 16th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Icon SMI

Jacquizz Rodgers

Running back Jacquizz Rodgers rounds out the Top 25 of Falcons players. You can see why Rodgers ranks here due to the scoring system.
Total Score: 45

Player Grade: 50 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 1 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 28 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +2
Positional Bonus: +3

Similar to Jason Snelling, Rodgers ranking isn’t higher simply because there are a lot more proven running backs elsewhere in the league. At this point, the only team he could probably go to and start on is the St. Louis Rams who are expected to feature Daryl Richardson, a similar back.

Rodgers is a quick, explosive tailback that lacks top-end speed. He has a short, very compact build which gives him good power for a player his size (as Earl Thomas can attest), but he’s not a guy that can consistently run over defenders. But he does pick up yards after contact because of his low height allows him to get under undisciplined tackles that try to take him on too high.

Rodgers primary asset to the Falcons in his ability in the passing game. Even with the addition of Steven Jackson, he may still rank as the team’s most potent weapon there due to his big-play ability on screens. As said earlier, Rodgers doesn’t have great top-end speed, but he accelerates quickly which allows him to make the grab and quickly get upfield for maximum yardage on screens. Dirk Koetter reintroduced the screen pass to the offense last year to great effect, as it had been sorely missing for the better part of a decade in Atlanta.

The Falcons will still likely mix in Rodgers frequently in the passing game. But given that Jackson won’t need to be pulled off the field in those situations in the same manner that Michael Turner did, it’s likely going to be less reps. But Rodgers should still have opportunities early in games to spell Jackson. But his 2013 workload may be reminiscent of what it was for most of his rookie season and the early half of 2012, where he may be lucky to see more than three carries in a game.

The key for Rodgers will be taking full advantage of those limited opportunities, providing more big plays both on the ground and in the air when given chances. In two seasons with 151 combined carries, Rodgers has just 2 runs that gained 20 or more yards. In the passing game, he’s caught a total of 74 passes with 3 of them going for 20 or more yards. Ideally, he’ll at least meet if not exceed his career total of plays of 20 or more yards (5 or more), even if he receives less than half the number of his career touches in 2013.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 11:34 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... lford-8335

Ranking the Falcons: No. 24 Robert Alford
July 16th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Robert Alford

Falcons rookie corner Robert Alford comes in ranked 24th on the team. You can click here to find out the scoring system that led to his ranking.
Total Score: 48

Player Grade: 50 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 7 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 24 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +4

Although Alford has yet to play a snap with the Falcons, his relatively high grade is due to the sheer number of young, untested cornerbacks elsewhere in the league. He could start potentially on as many as seven teams, all of which go into 2013 with untested and unproven young corners that Alford is arguably more talented than.

Alford is blessed with good athleticism and speed, and will be competing for reps at the starting right cornerbac spot in Atlanta. However the more likely scenario is that he settles in as the team’s fourth quarterback, a spot vacated by Chris Owens who is now in Cleveland competing for a starting spot. That is one of the teams that Alford could potentially start for from Day One. In Atlanta, Owens primarily served on special teams this past year, where he was an effective gunner. When injuries mounted at the cornerback position, particularly late in the year with Asante Samuel’s shoulder injury, Owens got more reps in the lineup as the nickel back. Alford likely will be expected to play the same role, as he’s listed as Samuel’s primary backup at left cornerback on the team’s depth chart. Alford has been working on the outside and inside, although he probably won’t see too many reps at the latter unless Robert McClain goes down with an injury.

Like Owens, Alford’s primary value in 2013 may come on special teams. Not only does Alford have the potential to contribute as a gunner on coverage units, he also may win the Falcons return duties as well. Alford shined as a punt returner in college, but his skillset might be ideally suited to returning kickoffs as well. He nearly scored a touchdown in the Senior Bowl on a kickoff no thanks to current teammate Desmond Trufant. His long speed is something the Falcons haven’t seen on returns since the heyday of Allen Rossum. If Alford shows that ball security is not an issue, then he is certainly the front runner to man either spot this season heading into camp.
Share this:

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 2:41 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... nolds-8341

Ranking the Falcons: No. 23 Garrett Reynolds
July 17th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Edit Leave a comment Go to comments
Derick E. Hingle-US PRESSWIRE

Garrett Reynolds

Earning the 23rd-ranked distinction on the Falcons is offensive guard Garrett Reynolds. Click here to read the scoring system used to provide these rankings.
Total Score: 50

Player Grade: 50 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 8 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 2 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 28 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +3

Garrett Reynolds entered the 2012 season with a lot of questions about his ability to perform. And for the most part I believed he answered them. But ultimately an injury sidelined him after seven games, and just like in 2011 he did not finish the year as the starter.

Reynolds hopes to have better luck with his third opportunity to start. He will enter camp atop the Falcons’ depth chart at right guard. Reynolds probably will win the starting job with competition only coming from Joe Hawley to start things. If Mike Johnson loses the competition at right tackle quickly, then he might be moved inside to push Reynolds. But given the time frame of such a move, it appears that Reynolds probably wouldn’t be in any danger assuming he plays well in camp.

Reynolds has struggled playing inside at guard mainly due to his tall frame. At 6-7 and some change, it leads him to play fairly high. When facing powerful defensive tackles that are often only 6-2 or 6-3, it allows them to be in a better position to create leverage inside the phone both that is playing inside. Good technique is a must for a player with Reynolds’ size, as he must play with better balance and lower hands than what is natural for him given his height. He improved that technique in 2012 and was having a solid campaign before his injury.

His height also prevents Reynolds from being a “mover” as a run blocker as he’s not a guy that can get low enough to consistently drive defenders off the ball. But he is a decent position blocker that if he can be more consistent with his ability to get leverage can be an effective run blocker. Tyson Clabo, who also towered at a smidge under 6-7, was that type of player and the most consistent run blocker, so there is the potential for Reynolds to be far from a liability as a run blocker.

Reynolds is a solid player, but his upside might be less than players like Johnson and Lamar Holmes, who won’t have to overcome height issues as they continue to grow moving forward. The Falcons liked Reynolds enough to give him a two-year contract at low-end starter money, so they are clearly comfortable with him filling the starting lineup. But he may be viewed as more of a stopgap than a long-term solution at the position. How he performs this year could go a long way to change that perspective.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 2:42 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... hnson-8344

Ranking the Falcons: No. 22 Mike Johnson
July 17th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Edit Leave a comment Go to comments
Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Mike Johnson

Ranking 22nd on the Falcons is offensive lineman Mike Johnson. Click here to read about the scoring system used to provide these rankings.
Total Score: 50

Player Grade: 50 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 10 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 0 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 28 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +3

Mike Johnson earns the highest ranking of the Falcons untested linemen that aren’t named Baker, Blalock, or Konz. Part of that is because of my initial belief that Johnson was a highly talented guard prospect coming out of Alabama. Johnson hasn’t exactly proven that yet in his three years in Atlanta. Injuries have been partially a reason why. He nearly unseated Garrett Reynolds in a camp competition in 2011, but injuries prevented Johnson from getting the necessary reps to supplant Reynolds.

Another reason is versatility. After manning the left guard position behind Justin Blalock as a rookie, Johnson moved to right guard in 2011. Then in 2012, he moved to right tackle as the primary reserve behind Tyson Clabo. During last season, Johnson served as the team’s sixth lineman functioning as a tight end and produced in that role. Essentially the only position that he hasn’t played extensively at is center after working some at left tackle in Atlanta and Alabama.

That is what helps him in his ranking, allowing him to potentially start on as many as ten other NFL teams. For some that would be at right tackle and for others potentially at guard. It also means that Johnson could find a role on the vast majority of NFL teams, albeit mainly as a backup at swing tackle or guard.

Johnson will be facing competition this summer from Lamar Holmes at right tackle. But he’ll have the opportunity for the first time in his career to be the front-runner for a starting position. If history repeats itself, then it likely means he’ll emerge as the winner of the battle. If so, and he is able to turn that into a productive year as a starter, he’ll have a chance to earn a long-term contract from Atlanta next off-season when he is due to hit free agency. Where the Falcons see his long-term prospects remains to be seen. The Falcons are going to want to get Holmes an opportunity to start eventually, which means that even if Johnson plays well at tackle this year, his future may still lie inside at guard where he could compete with Reynolds in 2014.

Johnson could compete with Reynolds this summer, although that seems like a longshot barring an early setback at right tackle. Johnson doesn’t have the natural feet of a polished tackle, but he’s shown definite improvement in that area over the past few summers. That was a similar criticism levied at Clabo over the years, as many felt that he was a more natural guard. But Clabo solidified the Falcons right tackle spot for six seasons despite that perceived shortcoming. Like Clabo, Johnson isn’t overly powerful although he ranks better in that arena that many of his Falcon counterparts. The key for him in 2013 will be adding that “plus” ability as a run blocker but also not being a liability in pass protection. It remains to be seen if he protects Matt Ryan from players like Charles Johnson, Cameron Wake, Ahmad Brooks, and Clay Matthews better than Clabo has in the past. And unfortunately for Johnson, he’ll have little room for error as Holmes will be looking over his shoulder.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 6:25 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... clain-8378

Ranking the Falcons: No. 21 Robert McClain
July 18th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports

Robert McClain

Cornerback Robert McClain comes in as the Falcons 21st-ranked player. Click here to read about the scoring system that earned him that distinction.
Total Score: 51

Player Grade: 54 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 8 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 25 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +4

McClain certainly earned the honor of being the Falcons most pleasant surprise in 2013. After being a player that looked like he was on the verge of being cut, he managed to stick on the roster. And after the injury to Brent Grimes in the season opener, he was catapulted into the lineup in the Falcons’ Week 2 win over the Denver Broncos where he was one of three Falcons to pick off Peyton Manning. McClain progressed a few weeks later to man the permanent nickel cornerback spot for the Falcons.

That position had been a major problem area for the Falcons for a number of years, but then McClain showed up and solidified it. He is penned to man the spot once again, amidst a competition at the right cornerback spot. While McClain could figure into that role, it’s likely that Falcons first rounder Desmond Trufant will win the battle. And it will be important for McClain to continue to play at a high level, given the likelihood of the ups and downs that will come with a rookie starter.

McClain is not the biggest, fastest, or most physical corner in the world, but he makes up for it with excellent awareness and ball skills. He is rarely caught out of position and can make plays on the ball. If he continues to showcase that talent, he could be in line for a big contract in the future. McClain will be a restricted free agent after this season, and ostensibly is signed through the 2014 season because of it. That is also the final year of Asante Samuel’s contract, and thus a strong 2013 campaign could put McClain in a position to be the front-runner to replace Samuel in 2015.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 6:26 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... rmann-8374

Ranking the Falcons: No. 20 Kroy Biermann
July 18th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Icon SMI

Kroy Biermann

The 20th ranked Falcons player is defensive end Kroy Biermann. Click here for the scoring system to explain his ranking.
Total Score: 54

Player Grade: 58 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 8 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 2 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 30 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +1
Positional Bonus: +4

Biermann is expected to stand atop the Falcons depth chart at defensive end again in 2013. Biermann gets a lot of criticism from Falcon fans considering that he is not a great pass rusher. But Biermann is fairly consistent with the production he does provide, which given the Falcons concerns at the position is a positive.

Biermann’s role in 2013 could be expanded some with him being featured more as a linebacker, dropping in coverage. Biermann performed that role last year, shining in the nickel as a player that could drop in coverage down the center of the field much like a middle linebacker in a Tampa-2 scheme. Biermann also was arguably the team’s most consistent run defender among their defensive linemen last year. Biermann’s versatility and relative consistency will make him an asset in Mike Nolan’s scheme due to his usage of multiple fronts. Because of that, that gives Nolan more flexibility with how he can use Osi Umenyiora and Jonathan Massaquoi, potentially maximizing their pass rush potential in the hopes that they can provide the much-needed spark.

Biermann also adds value on special teams. So while he may not be the ideal long-term starter for the Falcons off the edge, he is likely to have continued value as a role player even if he only has a few more peak years left.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 10:31 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... holas-8397

Ranking the Falcons: No. 19 Stephen Nicholas
July 19th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

Stephen Nichlas

The 19th-ranked Falcons player is linebacker Stephen Nicholas. Click here to see the scoring system used to devise these rankings.
Total Score: 56

Player Grade: 57 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 16 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 1 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 26 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +1
Positional Bonus: +3

Nicholas could potentially start on half the teams in the league. Mainly because he’s a more versatile player than he’s often given credit for. Nicholas possesses underrated pass rushing skills, and is a capable, physical run defender. He does his best work when he can play close to the line of scrimmage and come downhill. As a pass rusher, there are a few 3-4 teams that he could potentially line up on the outside and rush the quarterback.

Where Nicholas is limited is in coverage. It was an area that was never a strength of his due to stiff hips and less than ideal range. But now that he is 30 years old, Nicholas struggles even more. Those struggles were very apparent last year as the Falcons were routinely carved up in coverage by tight ends. That isn’t all on Nicholas’ shoulders, as fellow linebacker Sean Weatherspoon had his share of struggles alongside safety William Moore. But simply put, the Falcons overexposed Nicholas last year as an every down player, a role he had never assumed in his Falcon career since earning the starting strongside spot in 2009.

If the Falcons can get more contributions from Akeem Dent this year, then Nicholas can settle back into a more part-time role. While Nicholas has his limitations, he is a player that the coaching staff can trust. He plays his assignments and gives excellent effort every snap. The bonus that he is also a capable special teams player also means that even if he’s not getting reps on regular defense, he still finds ways to contribute on Sundays.

His status in Atlanta beyond 2013 is up in the air. He only has another year or two which can be considered “peak” seasons. Both Keith Brooking and Mike Peterson were age 32 when they began their final years in Atlanta and Jacksonville, respectively. After those years, both teams opted to part ways given the declining skill of both linebackers. And frankly, Nicholas simply hasn’t been quite the players that either Brooking or Peterson were prior to their dismissals. But even if 2013 is his final run, Nicholas has had a solid career in Atlanta. If he manages to start 15 games, then he’ll have 62 career starts in a Falcons uniform, exceeding former fourth round pick Henri Crockett by one. Which will be the most by any fourth round pick selected by the Falcons since Moe Gardner back in 1991, who started 85 games in a Falcons uniform.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 10:31 am 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ufant-8401

Ranking the Falcons: No. 18 Desmond Trufant
July 19th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Desmond Trufant

Coming in at the 18th spot is cornerback Desmond Trufant. Click here to see the scoring system used to devise these rankings.
Total Score: 55

Player Grade: 56 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 9 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 2 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 25 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +5
Positional Bonus: +4

At the 18th spot, Desmond Trufant marks the highest-ranked player that has yet to suit up for the Falcons. His higher ranking over more proven defenders like Stephen Nicholas and Kroy Biermann is largely due to his upside. As well as the fact that Trufant could potentially play a decade in Atlanta at peak level.

Trufant wasn’t a cornerback that I loved at Washington, but he certainly does have talent. Whether he will approach the upper echelon of players in the league remains to be seen but he can certainly be a valuable player for the Falcons moving forward.

Rookie corners typically don’t come in right away and produce at a high level, as they will often go through their share of ups and downs. But despite this, Trufant still has the potential to be an immediate upgrade over former right cornerback Dunta Robinson. That is because he has ball skills. That along with awareness were traits that Robinson lacked, leading to too many mental errors from him throughout his Falcon tenure. What mental errors Trufant may have in 2013 will be on account of youth, which couldn’t be used to excuse a nine-year veteran like Robinson last season. While Trufant only picked off six passes during his four years at Washington, he did break up 38 passes, including a combined 25 the past two years. That ability to break up passes should come in handy as Trufant likely will be tested often with Samuel playing across him.

Trufant will have to prove himself this summer, as he’ll compete with fellow rookie Robert Alford for the starting spot opposite Asante Samuel. But the expectation is that Trufant will win the job, even with a somewhat late start to the off-season. But his commitment to the team was clearly on display as he continued to work hard to keep up even as league rules prevented him from working with the team. That is very indicative of the work ethic and dedication that Trufant has, and it’s hard to imagine that not being rewarded with a starting spot when the Falcons open the season against the New Orleans Saints in September.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:07 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... osher-8413

Ranking the Falcons: No. 17 Matt Bosher
July 20th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Matt Bosher

The 17th-ranked Falcon player is punter Matt Bosher. Click here to read the scoring system that devised these rankings.
Total Score: 61

Player Grade: 60 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 16 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 16 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 16 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +5
Positional Bonus: +2

These rankings don’t really discriminate against specialists. Bosher is ranked fairly high because he’s a young, ascending player. After a dismal start to his career as a rookie in 2011, Bosher has really developed into one of the team’s more consistent players. He consistently showcases a strong leg as a punter, and if the Falcons can get a bit more consistency from their coverage units his production would be better.

Bosher has a big leg that can routinely help the Falcons flip field position. Of 12 punts made last year where the Falcons were backed up inside their own 20-yard line, 7 of them went for 50 or more yards. Bosher also displays his big leg on kickoffs, ranking tied for sixth in the league with 45 touchbacks.

Bosher certainly has room for growth in both areas. The growth he’s already shown in his short two-year career is immense, and if he has comparable growth over his next two years, he could be potentially considered among the best punters in the league by the time his first contract runs out.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:08 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... -konz-8416

Ranking the Falcons: No. 16 Peter Konz
July 20th, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
US PRESSWIRE

Peter Konz

The 16th-ranked player is center Peter Konz. Click here to read the scoring system that devised these rankings.
Total Score: 62

Player Grade: 54 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 18 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 5 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 31 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +5
Positional Bonus: +3

Despite struggling for most of his rookie season playing out of position at right guard, Konz ranks among the upper third of the roster. That is due to a number of factors. Firstly, his youth means that he gets a good bonus from the fact that he could play another decade or more at peak level. His versatility is also a bonus with the ability to play either guard or center for a number of teams. While he struggled at guard, he still could start at that position making it so that there are more teams that he could start for than not. His upside is also another reason why he gets a bonus. Moving to center should allow Konz to play at a much higher level this year, and his above average player grade reflects that. He was considered the top center in the 2012 draft class, and many had first round grades on him. He fell to the latter part of the second round more due to concerns over durability than ability.

The Falcons are in a position where they really need Konz to live up to that potential. If he does, he may be the first real success story that Thomas Dimitroff has had along the offensive line. While Sam Baker played well enough last year to earn a new contract with the Falcons, it remains to be seen if he lives up to that contract. Players like Mike Johnson, Garrett Reynolds, and Joe Hawley have yet to really carve out their value with the team.

Konz will be tasked with replacing Todd McClure, a fixture at center since 2000. Konz is a bigger, stronger, and more physical player than McClure, but it remains to be seen if he can showcase the intelligence and consistency that McClure had. McClure also was a very effective blocker downfield, something Konz struggled with last year. He’ll need to do a better job finding those middle linebackers on the second level if he wishes to develop into a top center.

The expectation probably shouldn’t be that Konz will be an immediate upgrade over McClure. More importantly, Konz just needs to be improved over his performance last season and look more comfortable. He’ll have plenty of time to grow into the position down the road. For now, the Falcons just are hoping that the dropoff from McClure to Konz is minimal, if not non-existent.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:08 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... eters-8420

Ranking the Falcons: No. 15 Corey Peters
July 21st, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
AP Photo/Tom Gannam

Corey Peters

Coming in as the 15th-ranked Falcon player is defensive tackle Corey Peters. You can click here to see the scoring system that was used to come up with these rankings.
Total Score: 63

Player Grade: 60 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 18 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 5 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 31 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +3
Positional Bonus: +3

Corey Peters is in an interesting position this upcoming season. He enters the final year of his contract, and is in a position where his play in 2013 can secure his financial future for the rest of his life.

Having spoken with Peters personally, he sounds (and from what I’ve heard looks) like a man that is poised to step up his play this year. And step up his play he must. I’ve outlined in the past that Peters needs to play at a higher level than he has in the past.

When the Falcons drafted Peters in the third round of the 2010 draft, many considered it to be a reach since most draft “experts” had Peters graded a round or two lower than that. Peters has since lived up to his third round billing, but perception of him isn’t helped when a player like Geno Atkins, who was taken a round later, is now widely considered the league’s best defensive tackle. Will Peters ever be on the same plane as Atkins? No. But he won’t need to be. But he needs to be a more consistent disruptive presence than he has been in the past three years.

Peters is a capable run stopper, so much so that if the Falcons do eventually move towards a 3-4 scheme, he is a viable candidate to man the nose tackle spot. Along with his continued effort against the run, the hope will be that he takes that next step as a pass rusher. Peters isn’t blessed with the quickness of players like Atkins or Jonathan Babineaux, so he will have to rely more off how effective he is with his hands to beat blockers and get consistent pressure on quarterbacks. The capability is there, we just need to see it in 2013. If so, he has a chance to climb next year’s rankings of Falcons players. Then he could turn into a player that could start on not just half the NFL teams, but could potentially start on nearly all NFL teams.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:09 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... baker-8423

Ranking the Falcons: No. 14 Sam Baker
July 21st, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments
Christopher Hanewinckel-US PRESSWIRE

Sam Baker

Falcons offensive tackle Sam Baker ranks 14th among the team. Click here to read about the scoring system devised for these rankings.
Total Score: 63

Player Grade: 61 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 18 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 3 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 32 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +2
Positional Bonus: +4

Baker’s ranking on this list benefits from the fact that he plays a priority position (left tackle), can start on most NFL teams, and could certainly serve as a swing tackle on every NFL franchise. All of those factors give him significant value, even if as an individual he is far from impressive.

I was critical of Baker’s contract when he signed it. The main reason being that given his play over the past five seasons, I don’t think it was a sound bet for the Falcons to make a three-year commitment to Baker. I would have preferred to see the Falcons give him a contract that potentially allowed them an out a year earlier.

No doubt that is somewhat of a nitpick, the difference of a single year. Especially given the fact that I did agree that Baker deserved a new deal from the team based off his improved play in 2012. If Baker can play at that level or slightly above it for the next two or three years, then whatever complaints I have about the deal are moot.

2012 represented the best of Sam Baker we’ve seen so far. While I do think he can make improvements, I doubt he will be significantly better than he was then. The only real difference moving forward for Baker may be just being more consistent. His A game will never match that of the top left tackles, but if he can give an A-level performance most weeks, then there is little room to complain. Baker is not a powerful player, and because of it has been somewhat a mismatch for the team’s blocking scheme over the past five years due to their emphasis on man blocking principles. Offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter has introduced a bit more zone blocking into the mix, something that Baker is better suited for. But with drafting players like Peter Konz and Lamar Holmes, and undrafted additions like Phillipkeith Manley, Terren Jones, Ryan Schraeder, it’s clear that the Falcons still emphasize size, power, and strength that is necessary to be a successful man-blocking team. And that is another reason why I was critical of the Baker contract, committing long-term to a player that is not an ideal fit for your scheme. Holmes is a better long-term fit for that scheme at the position, but it certainly remains a question mark if he’s currently ready for a starting position.

The Falcons aren’t really paying Baker to open running lanes. They are paying him to protect Matt Ryan’s blindside. And he did that better last year than probably anyone has in Atlanta for nearly a decade, since the heyday of Bob Whitfield. Baker has good feet and finally seems to be playing with the sort of polished technique he was known for during his days at USC.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2013 1:48 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ckson-8418

Ranking the Falcons: No. 13 Steven Jackson
July 22nd, 2013 Aaron Freeman Leave a comment Go to comments

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Steven Jackson
Ranking 13th on the Falcons is running back Steven Jackson. Click here to read the scoring system devised for these rankings.

Total Score: 64

Player Grade: 65 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 13 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 12 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 32 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +0
Positional Bonus: +3

Today, Steven Jackson turns 30. And that age is what hurts Jackson in these rankings. There are a lot of young, up and coming backs elsewhere in the league with fresh legs. Jackson’s legs may be as fresh as they come for a 30-year old, but for most NFL teams at this point in his career he would be considered a situational player. Last year, only 3 starting running backs in the league began the season age 28 or older: Jackson, Michael Turner, and Frank Gore. This year, there will be three more to that list: Adrian Peterson, BenJarvus Green-Ellis, and Reggie Bush. It’s a young man’s position.

But Jackson looks to show that he still has quite a bit left in the tank. Previously, I’ve compared his potential impact in Atlanta to that of Corey Dillon’s impact in New England back in 2004. Dillon turned 30 that year as well and had an outstanding season helping reestablish a Patriots ground attack that led them to a Super Bowl win. Jackson hopes to improve what was an abysmal ground attack for the Falcons last year spear-headed by Turner.

Jackson brings power and physicality to the Falcons offense, something that had diminished in Turner over the years. He also brings much-needed value in the passing game, where he won’t need to be pulled off the field when the Falcons utilize the no-huddle attack. The no-huddle was the bread and butter of the Falcons offense last year, and Turner had to give way to Jacquizz Rodgers due to poor hands. Jackson will be a true everydown back for the team in 2013.

But the Falcons will probably also try and pick and choose spots for Jackson. They will likely want him to be more of a fourth quarter finisher, a role in which Rodgers proved to be more effective than Turner at times last season. They will also want to keep Jackson fresh for the stretch run at the end of the year, which means he could also be on a “pitch count” early in the season. All that said, Jackson has the potential to be a lot more valuable to the Falcons in 2013 than this ranking indicates.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 12:28 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ecoud-8447

Ranking the Falcons: No. 12 Thomas DeCoud
July 22nd, 2013 Aaron Freeman No comments

Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

Thomas DeCoud
Falcons safety Thomas DeCoud ranks as their 12th-best player. You can see how DeCoud managed to leapfrog Steven Jackson by clicking here.

Total Score: 67

Player Grade: 64 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 21 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 12 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 27 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +2
Positional Bonus: +3

There is a changing of the guard with the safety position in the NFL. Long-time standouts like Troy Polamalu, Ed Reed, and Adrian Wilson, all of whom will be considered for Canton when they hang it up, are nearing the end. Young players such Earl Thomas, Jairus Byrd, and Eric Berry potentially offer a new vanguard of emerging top safeties.

While I don’t consider DeCoud to be among that emerging vanguard, he’s not far behind. Evidenced by the fact that he could start at free safety for two-thirds of NFL teams.

DeCoud is coming off his most productive season, as he grabbed a team-leading 6 interceptions, the second-most of any safety in the NFL (only behind New York Giants’ Stevie Brown). But despite a great 2012 campaign, I wouldn’t say DeCoud was a drastically improved player at least when discussing his skillset. He’s still an undersized run defender that can struggle with missed tackles in run support (11.5 missed tackles in 2012, 5.5 in 2011) and is not capable of matching up one on one in man coverage against quality wideouts and tight ends.

But DeCoud certainly was more consistent at times. Missed tackles aside, he was able to better avoid traffic in run support (key blocked 3 times in 2012 vs. 7.5 times in 2011). He also didn’t get for nearly as many touchdowns (4 blown coverages for scores in 2011, 0.5 in 2012), and he of course increased his turnover output from four to seven (including one forced fumble). All this means that DeCoud played a lot smarter in 2012 than he appeared to be doing in 2011. And much of that likely has to do with the fact that Mike Nolan was calling the defense rather than Brian VanGorder. And given DeCoud’s role at free safety where he calls the coverages, there is no reason to expect any dropoff from him in 2013.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 12:28 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... ryant-8458

Ranking the Falcons: No. 11 Matt Bryant
July 23rd, 2013 Aaron Freeman No comments
AP Photo/Dave Martin

Matt Bryant

The 11th-ranked Falcon player is kicker Matt Bryant. Click here to review the scoring system devised to create these rankings.
Total Score: 68

Player Grade: 62 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 23 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 23 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 23 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +0
Positional Bonus: +2

As I mentioned before when discussing punter Matt Bosher, these rankings don’t discriminate against specialists. If you are one of the best specialists in the league, then it will raise your stock here.

And that certainly applies to Matt Bryant. Since joining the team in late 2009, Bryant has been a model of consistency. So much so that even a minor lull from him causes concern with Falcon fans. But Bryant has been a rock in clutch kicking situations, making all six of his tries in potential game-winning situations.

Bryant has earned the nickname “Money” because he is so reliable, particularly in the Georgia Dome where he has made 91% of his 58 field goal tries. Three of his five misses at home came last year in a three-game span in what could be considered a slump for Bryant. But he still managed to hit 10 out of 13 kicks in that three-game span, which indicates a “slump” for Bryant still means he’s a pretty good kicker.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 12:28 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... alock-8460

Ranking the Falcons: No. 10 Justin Blalock
July 23rd, 2013 Aaron Freeman 1 comment
Icon Sports Media, Inc.

Justin Blalock

Now entering the Top 10 of Falcons players, guard Justin Blalock comes into the mix. Click here to review the scoring system devised to create these rankings.
Total Score: 76

Player Grade: 65 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 28 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 21 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 30 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +1
Positional Bonus: +3

One of the things I noticed when ranking Justin Blalock was the sheer lack of quality guards that currently play in the NFL. A lot of teams have a “plug and play” attitude when it comes to guards. Most NFL guards are converted from collegiate tackles, typically guys that lacked the athleticism and/or size to play on the outside in the pros. Blalock counts himself among that type of player, having spent about three-quarters of his career at Texas playing right tackle. Many teams will continue to stick with average or underachieving guards for multiple seasons because there is much less emphasis on the position. One only has to look at the Falcons right guard position to see this at work. Since Harvey Dahl departed the team two years ago, the Falcons have had a revolving door at the position. Such would never happen at either tackle spot, and I doubt a team would allow that to happen at center given that most teams feel continuity starts there.

It’s why Blalock is helped in these rankings, because there just aren’t that many good guards in the league. There are probably 15-20 guards that add significant value to their respective lines, and the rest are simply players that get the job done with little fanfare. I think that could have described Blalock for much of his career. But I now count Blalock among the guys that add value, but towards the lower end.

The thing about Blalock is that he is a well-rounded player. He doesn’t really excel at anything but does everything to a competent level, or slightly above. He’s not a powerful player that will consistently push the pile, nor a player that excels at pulling or blocking downfield, nor is he a great pass protector that can be left on an island against top-notch competition. But he does all of those things to competent to good level, which certainly makes him effective.

Back in 2011, I believed the Falcons would have been better served re-signing Dahl rather than Blalock. And a key reason for that was because when you looked at Michael Turner’s best games in the previous seasons, it often coincided with games where fullback Ovie Mughelli and Dahl also played at high levels. Such a correlation never really existed with Blalock. And frankly, in the four years that I’ve been reviewing games, I’m not sure that there really has ever been an instance where I said to myself watching the tape, “Oh man, Blalock is really kicking ass out there.”

But Blalock is a relatively steady performer, that you know what you’re going to get out of him. That may never be a dominant performance, but the number of really poor performances are also few in number. Off his individual ability alone, I would not consider Blalock to be one of the ten best players on the Falcons. But relative to many of the players that play the same position he does elsewhere in the league, Blalock is highly valuable.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Ranking the Falcons: No. 1-33
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 12:29 pm 
Offline
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
Purveyor of Truth & Justice
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 3:03 pm
Posts: 26136
Location: North Carolina
http://falcfans.com/ranking-the-falcons ... moore-8462

Ranking the Falcons: No. 9 William Moore
July 24th, 2013 Aaron Freeman No comments
F. Medina-US PRESSWIRE

William Moore

The 9th-ranked Falcon player is safety William Moore. Click here to review the scoring system devised to create these rankings.
Total Score: 79

Player Grade: 70 out of 100
Teams he could start for: 28 out of 32
Teams he is best position player: 21 out of 32
Teams he could find role on: 30 out of 32
Peak-Year Bonus: +1
Positional Bonus: +3

As I mentioned before with Thomas DeCoud, William Moore is probably not going to be one of the new up and coming elite safeties to take over for players like Troy Polamalu and Adrian Wilson as big stars in the NFL. But Moore is a very good safety that ranks highly, and is only a notch below those players.

While Moore wouldn’t be considered a great coverage safety, he does manage to impact there. He is very opportunistic in coverage despite not having great man-to-man cover skills. In fact, when put in situations where he has to play man to man, he often struggles. But he makes up for it by consistently being in the right place at the right time, and when he has an opportunity to pick off a pass on a tipped ball or the like, he almost always does.

But Moore really grades highly with his ability to impact in run support. He’s one of the hardest-hitting safeties in the game today. And his ability to play the run is better than many linebackers. An interesting question that will be raised for Moore moving forward is the league’s new rule against spearing. Moore has shown no problem with lowering the crown of his helmet and driving it into ballcarriers thus far in his four-year Falcon career. Now those instances will draw a lot more penalties, and it remains to be seen how Moore adjusts. It shouldn’t be too hard since Moore is an excellent wrap tackler. But his craving for those bone-jarring highlight-making hits might have to subside somewhat with refs more willing to throw flags.

One of the things that prevents Moore from being higher-ranked is the position he plays, and the fact that the shelf-life of NFL safeties isn’t very good. Moore just turned 28 in May, but may only have another two or so years of peak potential because of the wear and tear that comes with playing the safety position, especially when you play it as physically as Moore does. He has missed a quarter of each of the past two seasons due to injuries. The Falcons hope that with his new contract, Moore can be a bit more durable moving forward due to his high value to the team.

_________________
"Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis" -- Maharbal, 216 B.C.E.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 4 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to: