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 Post subject: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 12:09 pm 
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While the general consensus that signing Osi is no more than a lateral move from Abe; I do think there is one significant upgrade.

Osi has made it to the Super Bowl and won. He's done it with teams that where largely underdogs that nobody thought could go the distance. Bringing someone that has been on those teams with that mentality is going to be a boost for the teams overall mental state IMO.

There is a lot of value for a team to have guys that have rings and can help motivate everyone else to get there next year. So long as Osi can give us a similar production to Abe I think the experience he brings make him at least a minor upgrade overall.

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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 1:19 pm 
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Osi was a cancer during his time with Giants, they didn't win because of him, they won in spite of him.

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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 5:14 pm 
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"Our source was the New York Times."

Umenyiora Looks Beyond Next Sack, Wondering What It All Means
By SAM BORDEN
Published: October 13, 2012

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — One day last week, the Giants’ defensive linemen were discussing money in their meeting room at the team’s training center. Several players had watched a television documentary about seemingly flush athletes going broke after their careers ended, and a casual conversation quickly turned more passionate.

At one point, defensive tackle Marvin Austin recalled, it was as if Osi Umenyiora were in church. Umenyiora, a veteran defensive end, was confessor and preacher — first telling his teammates about all the mistakes he had made over the years, then imploring them to listen closely so they would never suffer the same fate. Umenyiora locked eyes with Austin, a third-year player, to emphasize his point; he turned to be sure the young star Jason Pierre-Paul could hear him.

To outsiders, the scene would appear incongruous. Justin Tuck, the unit’s captain, is the talker on defense. Chris Canty has a raw, unfiltered side to him, too. They are the emotional souls of the line. Umenyiora, a two-time Pro Bowl selection and All-Pro pass rusher, is supposed to be the sullen one, the standoffish one. He is the one who has continually engaged the team in contract disputes the past few seasons — to the point that, by his own account, he became known to fans as “the guy on the stationary bike” because that is how he often spent training camp workouts.

But this label, it seems, is lacking. Countless athletes have said they are misunderstood, generally as a way to explain mistakes, and several Giants even used that word to describe Umenyiora. The difference is that Umenyiora never did.

“It isn’t misunderstood,” he said in a rare extended interview here, drawing out his words. “That’s too easy. I think, maybe, it’s just — incomplete.”

In some ways, that mystery is by design. Umenyiora’s reticence with the public and the news media is not by accident. While Tuck and quarterback Eli Manning readily make themselves available in the locker room, Umenyiora generally stays away. Typically, he speaks to reporters once a week (on Fridays, when fewer are present) and when he does, he rarely ventures beyond the mundane.

“Look, it took me a whole year to get to know the guy,” Canty said. “When I first met him, I couldn’t stand him. I’ll admit that. But what people don’t realize is that he is incredibly smart, incredibly thoughtful and one of the most interesting people you could ever meet.”

Canty laughed, adding, “You just have to get him to talk to you.”

Umenyiora readily acknowledges his aversion to the spotlight.

“I won’t lie to you,” he said. “I’ve wished that I wasn’t in such a big market, that I could have just gone about my business and played football and been in a small corner somewhere where nobody knows anything.”

Yet his reticence is more philosophical.

Umenyiora spent his childhood in London and in his native Nigeria, then moved to the United States as a teenager. He did not play football until 11th grade, then earned a business degree from Troy University in Alabama, and developed an abiding appreciation for history, politics and religion. He recently finished reading the Bible and started the Koran. Tuck revealed that he and Umenyiora were in the midst of a long-running discussion comparing Clinton-era economics with the policies of President Obama.

Quite simply, Umenyiora said, he does not understand all the fuss about the N.F.L.

“That’s the thing,” he said, pointing two fingers at his own body. “Look at what I do. I put on tights and go out there and try to hit someone. It’s hard, but is it really important? Does it matter? Why should we get any attention at all?”

He was not being modest or feigning humility, but simply asking a question. Umenyiora will often raise broader points about a subject, regardless of how universally accepted it is, said Adewale Ogunleye, who retired from the N.F.L. in 2010 and is one of Umenyiora’s closest friends.

The two once spent an inordinate amount of time, Ogunleye said, debating the merits of flying first class when an exit-row seat offered the same leg room. Umenyiora, Ogunleye recalled, was trying to be sure that Ogunleye found some value in the first-class seat as opposed to simply wanting it because he thought that is where a professional athlete should sit.

“He just doesn’t accept things because they are what everyone else accepts,” Ogunleye said. “He needs to see the reason behind it. He needs to think about it.”

Along those lines, Ogunleye added that Umenyiora was seemingly immune to fads and trends. When a visitor recently chided Umenyiora for still having a BlackBerry in a locker room full of iPhones and Androids, he said defiantly: “I really love this thing. Why change?” Umenyiora also avoids designer clothes. He frequently wears dark gray Crocs sandals to and from team headquarters (to complement his gray sweat pants) and once, when Ogunleye and Umenyiora went out for a night on the town with friends, Umenyiora showed up in full Nigerian dress. Their companions were surprised, but “that’s just what he does,” Ogunleye said.

“He wears what he wants even if some people thought it was like something out of ‘Coming to America,’ ” Ogunleye added. “He doesn’t care.”

When Umenyiora bows to public pressure, it rarely goes well. He recently gave in and began reading “Fifty Shades of Grey” (“It was like you couldn’t get away from people talking about it,” he said) but quit after just a few pages because “the writing was just so cheesy I was like, ‘Come on man, you can’t do this.’ ”He added, “I didn’t even get to the good parts.”

Lately, Umenyiora has found himself thinking of the future more. He will be 31 next month. He has struggled along with the rest of the defensive line over the Giants’ first five games, and he is not signed beyond this season.

The notion that he is nearing the end of his career has changed his perspective. That was part of the motivation for his talk in the meeting room, he said, and he acknowledged that he now viewed his contract battles with the Giants differently.

The disputes — which involved public posturing by each side, occasional name-calling, aborted trade attempts and a holdout, among other tactics — dragged on acrimoniously. And when they finally ended, Umenyiora repeatedly said he had no regrets, even though he ultimately secured little in terms of money.

Now, though, his opinion has changed. He recalled a moment after the Giants won the Super Bowl last February, when a reporter approached him in the midst of the giddy celebration and wanted to know how he felt about his contract. Umenyiora’s face fell.

“It was like a cloud hanging over me,” he said. “It was terrible. It felt like it would never go away.

“Of course I regret it,” Umenyiora added. “Because nothing was really accomplished out of it. I didn’t really gain anything. The extra money I’m making this year? Even 10 times that wasn’t worth what I had to endure.”

He laughed. “I have a business degree, but I’m not a good businessman — you could tell that through everything I do,” he said. “That contract stuff — that was the worst thing I ever could have done.”

That is what Umenyiora told the other defensive linemen, he said, using those exact words. He believed in the principle that N.F.L. teams cut players in the middle of contracts, so players should be free to renegotiate as well, but he “never imagined it would get so ugly.”

It was hard to acknowledge his errors, Umenyiora said, but he is changing. Lately he has talked more about family, particularly with Tuck and Ogunleye. Umenyiora “has dated the most attractive women on the face of the Earth,” Ogunleye said, and has a 5-year-old son, Tijani, whom he wishes he saw even more than he does. But he has never married, choosing instead to “run around,” as he described it.

For a long time, Umenyiora said, he believed he might never get married. His parents divorced when he was an infant and that made him “not very easy to love,” he said. He almost never discusses his home life.

But for a moment, he opened up. “Your mother? Your family?” he said. “That’s how you learn to love. I used to think I didn’t need that, but now I know I do. I want that love someday, too.”

He smiled then, not sullen or surly or sour at all. Umenyiora’s public image may never fully recover from the arrows of the past few off-seasons, but that does not mean he should be defined by it. He made sure to remind his teammates of that in the meeting room, too.

“I told them, ‘It takes a genius to learn from other people’s mistakes,’ ” he said. “It’s true. Most people, they have to learn from their own.”


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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:26 am 
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Umenyiora said
Quote:
“That’s the thing,” he said, pointing two fingers at his own body. “Look at what I do. I put on tights and go out there and try to hit someone. It’s hard, but is it really important? Does it matter? Why should we get any attention at all?”


Ok, I don't want him now; he doesn't get it!! Its like a gifted actor or singer, or even
some businessmen, he provides a service. People go to to the movies to be entertained; people watch all kinds of rock bands; country music, ect, ect, and none of it is really important and we could all live without it.

Since he doesn't understand why he has value I doubt he values himself as a football player. He just said it, " he puts on tights and goes out to hit people" If he doesn't understand that millions are watching; and that's why he's getting paid; when the going gets tough; I question if he'll get going. If he wants a small market maybe its so he can coast and just get a paycheck without thinking he'll still be watched closely.

I guy that doesn't understand an obligation to his teammates; or understand why a city or people think its exciting; I just question what would make him tick on the field??

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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 7:17 am 
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Why does a city or its people think it's exciting?

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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 11:14 am 
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That's like asking why its dark at night?

There are too many reason's why people think football is exciting. The match ups,
the big hits, a Qbs precision; ect, ect.........

Usually people who do not consider what they do as a profession as meaningful aren't really motivated to be their best, why bother since it doesn't mean anything?

I don't know the guy, he just sounds like a chump who's talking about "the meaning of life" when he's suppose to be excited about signing a new contract.....

He might as well say why do you want to win on Sunday; what does it all mean? Well
it doesn't mean jack if you don't care about your profession!!

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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 3:16 pm 
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I understand where you're coming from Cyril. It's very clear that Osi is the type of guy that plays football because he's good at it, not because he loves it. Traditionally the Falcons have stayed away from these types of players and it has benefited them, and when they do go after these guys, it usually does not. A good example of the latter is Ray Edwards. Although I think a line of distinction could be made that Ray played for the perks (money, women, etc.) as opposed to Osi who doesn't seem all that interested in those types of things.

But I don't agree that it's like asking why the night is dark. That question has a very simple and easy answer, because the sun is on the other side of the planet due to the Earth's rotation.

Asking the question of why people like football is not a simple answer. Football is by far the most popular sport in this country, but there is still a sizable contingent of Americans that could really give a rat's patootie about it. But I think people like sports in general because of the competition, a sort of reconnection to that primal instinct that civilzation has attempted to quell over the millennia. But why football over other forms of competition? Probably because of the violence of it. Mankind, like all things natural is inherently violent, and America happens to be one of the more violent socities today. I also think the social aspects of fandom also are a big part of it. We are inherently social animals, and have a tendency to have a pack mentality of "us vs. them" and fandom certainly fosters that. That would be my theory. But I stress the word theory, because it's not a simple or easy answer.

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 Post subject: Re: One Plus w/Osi
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2013 12:44 am 
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Pudge wrote:
Asking the question of why people like football is not a simple answer. Football is by far the most popular sport in this country, but there is still a sizable contingent of Americans that could really give a rat's patootie about it. But I think people like sports in general because of the competition, a sort of reconnection to that primal instinct that civilzation has attempted to quell over the millennia. But why football over other forms of competition? Probably because of the violence of it. Mankind, like all things natural is inherently violent, and America happens to be one of the more violent socities today. I also think the social aspects of fandom also are a big part of it. We are inherently social animals, and have a tendency to have a pack mentality of "us vs. them" and fandom certainly fosters that. That would be my theory. But I stress the word theory, because it's not a simple or easy answer.


That's pretty much the reasons. Violence, games/warring as a fundamental biological trait that has been abandoned, and people's love for "grouping."

It's particularly noteworthy on the collegiate level, where people nearly define their lives by whether they're Dawgs Fans or Crimson Tide, when generally the people never went to the school. These dividing lines are powerful things.

And, I'll say, while I've never had the us/them thing personally very much, I've never felt as much like I'm doing what I was made to do as when I played sports. We spent millenia surviving by being in movement, and so those things feel right, seem right, look right.

...................

On the Osi thing, that's often the way with non-American born football players. Imagine if you got paid a ton to play cricket (or some Indian game). You'd play and be psyched about the money...but it'd never be a part of your DNA. With that said, I heard similar quotes from Okoye, and he played like a madman.


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