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 Post subject: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2009 12:10 pm 
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Our ranking of the country’s top draft-eligible prospects. Wes Bunting
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In the third installment of the NFP’s Super 30, we breakdown and rank the nation’s top draft-eligible prospects through the first seven weeks of the college football season.

1. QB Jake Locker, Washington (6-3, 226)
The nation’s top quarterback prospect.

2. DT Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma (6-4, 298)
Has been downright dominant at times and consistently controls the line of scrimmage.

3. DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska (6-4, 302)
Makes as many plays as any defensive lineman in the country; always seems to be around the football.

4. S Eric Berry, Tennessee (5-11, 203)
One of the most instinctive safeties to come along in years. Looks like an instant impact player in the NFL.

5. QB Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame (6-3, 223)
Made the necessary second-half adjustments last week vs. USC and looked very impressive in the fourth quarter, when it matted most.

6. ILB Rolando McClain, Alabama (6-4, 256)
Possesses an impressive athletic skill set for his size and has the ability to play in either a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme.

7. WR Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State (6-2, 220)
Although his suspension is still looming, Bryant is the nation’s most dynamic threat at receiver.

8. S Taylor Mays, USC (6-3, 235)
It isn’t often you find a safety who generates as much power on contact as Mays.

9. DT Terrence Cody, Alabama (6-5, 365)
All the guy does is make everyone around him better. I can’t imagine him lasting too long on draft day.

10. OT Bryan Bulaga, Iowa (6-6, 312)
He still hasn’t quite regained his form from a year ago, but I expect to see Bulaga really improve his play in the coming weeks.

11. DE Carlos Dunlap, Florida (6-6, 290)
As physically gifted as it gets, but he still seems to disappears from games far too often given his skill set.

12. WR Mike Williams, Syracuse (6-2, 204)
An impressive size/speed athlete who’s been extremely productive this season and forces defense to roll coverage his way.

13. RB Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech (5-11, 235)
Is averaging 6.2 yards per carry in his past four games and looks like a guy capable of carrying the load at the next level.

14. QB Ryan Mallett, Arkansas (6-7, 238)
He still has a way to go, but his physical skill set instantly makes him one of the nation’s top quarterback prospects.

15. RB Jahvid Best, California (5-10, 195)
An elite big-play threat who can hurt you in both the run and pass game.

16. DT Arthur Jones, Syracuse (6-3, 295)
A powerful interior presence who uses his hands well to shed blocks and always seems to make plays on the ball.

17. C Maurkice Pouncey, Florida (6-5, 318)
Exhibits an impressive combination of size, power and fluidity inside; looks like a guy who can step in and become an impact center from day one.

18. DT Marvin Austin, North Carolina (6-3, 305)
His improved instincts and overall technique have allowed him to take his game to another level.

19. DT Phil Taylor, Baylor (6-4, 355)
A massive interior lineman who has the ability to anchor a defense at the next level.

20. CB Kareem Jackson, Alabama (5-11, 192)
Showcases impressive fluidity and balance in and out of his breaks and always seems to be in position to make a play on the ball.

21. DE Everson Griffen, USC (6-3, 278)
A physicality gifted athlete who plays with natural leverage and displays impressive footwork and body control off the snap.

22. DE Derrick Morgan, Georgia Tech (6-4, 272)
Possesses the tools to get after the quarterback in a variety of ways off the edge.

23. RB C.J. Spiller, Clemson (5-11, 195)
A real X-factor who has an ability to create big plays in all facets of the game.

24. DE Jason Pierre-Paul, South Florida (6-6, 265)
He’s still raw but possesses a wingspan that goes on for days and might have more upside than any prospect in next year’s draft.

25. OT Anthony Davis, Rutgers (6-6, 325)
Showcases the size, power and fluidity to develop into a starting-caliber left tackle at the next level.

Ricky SappAPClemson OLB/DE Ricky Sapp

26. OLB/DE Ricky Sapp, Clemson (6-4, 248)
The guy makes a living behind the line of scrimmage and has the ability to consistently shed blocks and make plays on the football.

27. DE Jason Worilds, Virginia Tech (6-2, 252)
Exhibits an impressive first step, and his improved power and pad level have enhanced his ability to get after the passer.

28. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma (6-4, 223)
The biggest question about Bradford entering the year was, can he stay healthy behind an inexperienced offensive line? So far, the answer is no.

29. OLB Eric Norwood, South Carolina (6-0, 252)
He isn’t the tallest of linebackers, but the guy is a force when asked to make plays off the edge.

30. OT Charles Brown, USC (6-5, 292)
He not only has an ability to consistently mirror in pass protection, he’s also very natural when asked to pull and get out in space. Looks like the nation’s top senior offensive tackle.

Super 30 no more…

OT Russell Okung, Oklahoma State (6-5, 302)
A physically gifted lineman, but he needs to add more strength to his base. Gets bullied on contact too easily.

Arrelious BennAPIllinois WR Arrelious Benn

WR Arrelious Benn, Illinois (6-2, 220)
Has not been the consistent force we expected to see game in and game out.

DE Cameron Heyward, Ohio State (6-6, 287)
I love his physical skill set and upside, but he disappears from games far too often.

RB Noel Devine, West Virginia (5-8, 176)
Lacks size, but he’ll still find a way to contribute in a big way to an NFL offense.

DT Allen Bailey, Miami (6-4, 288)
All the tools are there, but he’s simply too inconsistent in his play at this time.

Just missed the cut…

CB Joe Haden, Florida (5-11, 190)
DE Greg Hardy, Ole Miss (6-4, 265)
OLB Von Miller, Texas A&M (6-2, 240)
RB Ryan Mathews, Fresno State (5-11, 220)
OG Mike Pouncey, Florida (6-5, 320)
ILB Josh Bynes, Auburn (6-2, 239)
OLB Bruce Carter, North Carolina (6-3, 225)
OLB/DE Jerry Hughes, TCU (6-2, 257)
ILB Brandon Spikes, Florida (6-3, 256)
FS Morgan Burnett, Georgia Tech (6-1, 210)
TE Ed Dickson, Oregon (6-4, 243)
TE Anthony McCoy, USC (6-5, 252)
TE Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma (6-6, 258)
OLB Rennie Curran, Georgia (5-11, 225)

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 11:48 am 
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Interesting to see the changes made since the middle of October...
The NFP Super 30

Only one QB makes our list, but plenty of defensive players. Wes Bunting
February 17, 2010 Print This
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With draft season now in full swing, here’s a breakdown of the nation’s top 30 players based on the National Football Post’s prospect grading scale.

1. DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska (6-4, 302)
Even with all the consistent double-teams thrown his way last season, Suh was still the country’s most dominant defensive lineman.

2. DT Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma (6-4, 298)
McCoy has the ability to be a factor both in the pass and run game at the next level and looks like one of the few instant impact-caliber defenders in this year’s draft.

Rolando McClainAPAlabama ILB Rolando McClain

3. ILB Rolando McClain, Alabama (6-4, 256)
McClain possesses an impressive athletic skill set for his size and has the ability to instantly contribute in either a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme.

4. S Eric Berry, Tennessee (5-11, 203)
Berry, one of the most instinctive safeties to come along in years, looks like a real ball-hawking-type defender at the next level.

5. C Maurkice Pouncey, Florida (6-5, 318)
Pouncey plays with impressive power and fluidity for his size and looks capable of starting from day one.

6. RB Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech (5-11, 235)
Dwyer is a violent runner who exhibits good vision between the tackles and has the initial burst to separate from defenders at the second level. He will only get better running in a more traditional NFL offense.

7. TE Aaron Hernandez, Florida (6-2, 250)
Hernandez is a potential mismatch nightmare at the next level in the Dallas Clark mold.

8. WR Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State (6-2, 220)
There are lingering questions about his character, but Bryant has the talent to consistently separate on the outside in the NFL.

Russell OkungAPOklahoma State OT Russell Okung

9. OT Russell Okung, Oklahoma State (6-5, 302)
Okung looks effortless in pass protection and is the draft’s most NFL-ready left tackle.

10. DE Derrick Morgan, Georgia Tech (6-4, 272)
Morgan possesses the tools to get after the quarterback in a variety of ways off the edge.

11. OT Anthony Davis, Rutgers (6-6, 325)
His athleticism and overall power are what really pop out on tape, and Davis does a great job shuffling his feet, keeping his base down and anchoring at the point of attack.

12. OG Mike Iupati, Idaho (6-5, 330)
Iupati makes everything look easy inside. He possesses an impressive blend of size, power and fluidity for the position and looks like one of the better offensive guard prospects to come along in years.

13. SS Chad Jones, LSU (6-3, 230)
Jones is a physically imposing safety who runs extremely well for his size and has the fluidity and ball skills to become an impact-caliber defensive back.

14. CB Joe Haden, Florida (5-11, 190)
A tall, long-armed corner, Haden has the closing speed to consistently get his hands on the throw and make plays on the football.

Jahvid BestAPCalifornia RB Jahvid Best

15. RB Jahvid Best, California (5-10, 195)
Best is a big-play threat every time he touches the ball, but he has to hope his concussion problems don’t linger throughout his career.

16. DT Brian Price, UCLA (6-2, 300)
Price is a powerful interior lineman who does a great job firing off the snap inside and using his length to fight his way into the backfield. He looks like a real disruptive force at the next level.

17. OT Bruce Campbell, Maryland (6-7, 310)
Campbell is a little raw, but he might have more physical upside than any offensive lineman in the draft. He has the quintessential skill set for the left tackle position.

18. RB C.J. Spiller, Clemson (5-11, 195)
Looks like a potential Felix Jones-type back at the next level.

19. OT Bryan Bulaga, Iowa (6-6, 312)
He has never quite regained his form from 2008, but Bulaga looks capable of anchoring the left side of an NFL offensive line for years.

20. DT Terrence Cody, Alabama (6-4, 370)
All the guy does is make everyone around him better; looks like an ideal 3-4 nose tackle who can anchor a defense inside.

Jason WorildsAPVirginia Tech DE/OLB Jason Worilds

21. DE/OLB Jason Worilds, Virginia Tech (6-2, 252)
Worilds exhibits an impressive first step, and his improved power and pad level have enhanced his ability to get after the passer.

22. OG/OT John Jerry, Ole Miss (6-6, 332)
Jerry possesses impressive lateral quickness and athleticism for a man his size and looks like a Leonard Davis-type guard in the NFL.

23. OLB/DE Ricky Sapp, Clemson (6-4, 248)
When healthy, Sapp makes a living behind the line of scrimmage. He has an ability to consistently shed blocks and quickly close on the football.

24. OT Charles Brown, USC (6-5, 292)
Brown not only possesses the footwork to consistently mirror in pass protection, he’s also very natural on the move in the run game. Looks ideally suited to play left tackle in a zone-blocking scheme.

25. FS Morgan Burnett, Georgia Tech (6-1, 210)
Another talented ball-hawking safety with impressive instincts and range in the center field-type role.

26. OC Matt Tennant, Boston College (6-4, 291)
Tennant isn’t the sexiest-looking prospect, but he’s a tough, technically sound center who looks capable of coming in and starting from day one.

Sam BradfordAPOklahoma QB Sam Bradford

27. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma (6-4, 223)
There are concerns about his durability, but Bradford is as accurate as they come and will be in high demand in a quarterback-starved league.

28. DE Brandon Graham, Michigan (6-1, 263)
Graham looks like one of the most NFL-ready players in the draft. He has a good first step, but it’s his power, leverage and suddenness on contact that make him so tough to block off the edge.

29. DT Jared Odrick, Penn State (6-5, 301)
Plays bigger than his frame indicates and does a great job firing off the snap, gaining initial leverage and finding the ball inside.

30. CB Kyle Wilson, Boise State (5-10, 186)
Showcases impressive balance and footwork in and out of his breaks and is as polished as any cornerback in this year’s class.

Follow me on Twitter: WesBunting

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 12:53 pm 
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So right Pudge...it is why I abhor rankings of any kind.They are fun, but that is where the usefulness ends..

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 2:25 pm 
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Quote:
2. DT Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma (6-4, 298)
Has been downright dominant at times and consistently controls the line of scrimmage.

3. DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska (6-4, 302)
Makes as many plays as any defensive lineman in the country; always seems to be around the football.


This to me is the most interesting draft thing currently, b/c I keep hearing McCoy, McCoy, but I'm not sure when I saw a DT as good as Suh this past year. I don't know how the stats match up, but its hard for me to fathom someone could be rated over Suh. I just don't remember a DT being in/around/on the ball consistently as much as him. High motor really would even begin to do him justice fwiw.

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 2:43 pm 
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It's about pass rushing potential. Suh has potential as a pass rusher, but there were too many instances where he seemed uninterested in pass rushing. McCoy has been a dominant pass rusher for two years now, and I'd make the argument is a bit more NFL ready than Suh in that McCoy should be an effective NFL pass rusher from Day 1. I'm not going to say he'll have 10 sacks right off the bat as a rookie. But if he's used in the right scheme (that is a 3 or 5 technique) then he can come in right away and be able to give probably any team 4-6 sacks as a rookie, which is very good for a rookie. Not sure, Suh is going to be able to contribute like that right away as a pass rusher.

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 3:47 pm 
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I guess I have to go off the games I saw Suh Nebraska play, VT, Texas and a couple others, and he was nearly unblockable most of the time. Most weren't dumb enough to single block, but still. I guess I didn't see enough of McCoy, but I can see the Tommie Harris comparisons. I don't think its Suh's ability to GET to the QB, but maybe it was consistency. But I'm telling you, its NOT ability. But I'm not sure about the consistency either, b/c he was EVERYWHERE those Neb games that I saw. Hell, when was the last time a DT was in the top3-5 of the Heisman (not that I put stock in the Heisman what so ever), just saying. Where was McCoy?

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 6:49 pm 
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Oh, I agree that when Suh wanted to get to the QB, he most often did. Had he gone after Tyrod Taylor in the VT-Nebraska game on the final play rather than sitting back and trying to bat down the pass, VT loses, and Suh effectively wins them the game.

But Suh took a lot of plays off. IMO, I think it's because he knew he was dominant, and wanted his teammates to get some love and increase their production. Had he wanted to, I think Suh could have had 20 sacks this year. But despite that, I don't think he's as polished a pass rusher as McCoy is.

McCoy I think is slightly better than Tommie Harris was coming out of OU 6 years ago.

As for why McCoy wasn't in the Heisman race is because he played on an irrelevant team, played with a lot of other top NFL prospects, and he didn't have ridiculous production. Suh's production this year was roughly what McCoy's was combined the past two years.

I've never seen McCoy have a bad/average game. And I saw 2 OU games this year and like 8 last year. I've seen Suh look average in games. Not this year (I saw 3 Neb games this year, and 2 or 3 last year), but last year he seemed like a 3rd round pick in the games I saw. McCoy has always looked like a Top 10 pick.

It's really taste I think when it comes down to the two. If you want a more polished pass rusher, then McCoy gets the edge. If you want the more dominant run stopper and a guy that offers more versatility to excel wherever you put him on the line, then you like Suh.

It's much the same as it was with Dorsey vs. Ellis. Dorsey was a dominant 3-technique guy, but hadn't shown the ability to excel in another role because he was never used that way. Ellis showed that he was an effective pass rusher wherever you put him on the USC line, whether at DE in a 3 or 4-man front, or either DT position. Dorsey got the nod in my book because he was a leader at LSU, and Ellis played at USC, a school known to produce NFL underachievers. Had Ellis gone to any other school, I might have ranked him higher than Dorsey.

If I was the Rams, I think I'd prefer Suh because I think he's a better fit in their defensive scheme. If I was the Lions, I'd probably prefer McCoy. Same for the Bucs, McCoy is probably a better fit for them. Both should get very high character grades. Suh was obviously a man amongst boys at Nebraska. Other than maybe a healthy Bradford, McCoy was clearly the best player at Oklahoma the past two years, so he was a man amongst men. SO that's another reason why there hasn't been a ton of hype with McCoy as much as Suh.

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:14 pm 
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Oh, I agree that when Suh wanted to get to the QB, he most often did. Had he gone after Tyrod Taylor in the VT-Nebraska game on the final play rather than sitting back and trying to bat down the pass, VT loses, and Suh effectively wins them the game.


Yeah, but TT was wearing him like a jacket when he made that throw. Better play by TT imho, but certainly Suh could have rushed sooner.

I think you hit the nail on the head with that analysis.

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 Post subject: Re: NFP's Super 30
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 12:51 pm 
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http://www.profootballweekly.com/2010/0 ... -franchise

Oklahoma's McCoy can be pillar of franchise

Posted Feb. 25, 2010 @ 9:39 a.m.
By Nolan Nawrocki

First in a series of six Combine scouting reports.

DT Gerald McCoy
Oklahoma junior
Ht: 6-3½ | Wt: 300 | 40-time: 5.0 (all estimated)

Upside: Has excellent size with explosive body power. Shocks blockers with his punch and torques blockers off the ground. Can leverage, lock out and rip off blocks with violent hand use. Plays extremely hard with urgency, and his motor is always running. Outstanding balance. Is quick to shed and covers a lot of ground in pursuit. Wears down opposing offensive lines with his tenacity. Has a strong club and arm-over. Instinctive — reads hats, anticipates well and sniffs out screens. Versatile and has lined up inside and outside. Plays big on the biggest of stages — see 2008 BCS championship game against Florida. Outstanding character and intangibles — is a highly respected team leader and the first sophomore captain in school history. Excellent work ethic.

Downside: Struggles some when he is double-teamed and at times gets washed down the line (although he played in a defense that featured a lot of slanting and stunting and at times put him in position to be pushed and run out). Can play with more consistent leverage.

The way we see it: An extremely quick, powerful, penetrating, prototypical three-technique or under tackle, McCoy possesses the type of explosion and instincts to become a disruptive force in NFL backfields. Compares very favorably to former 49ers all-star DT Bryant Young, even sharing a very similar mental makeup, tenacity and vocal on-field leadership presence. Has tremendous upside, clear Pro Bowl-caliber composition and will be a pillar of a franchise.

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