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 Post subject: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:17 pm 
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The most talented WR that goes under the radar can't shake injuries.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8 ... ee-surgery

Tennessee Titans' Kenny Britt again has knee surgery

By Gregg Rosenthal
Around The League editor
Published: July 17, 2012 at 03:39 p.m.
Updated: July 17, 2012 at 04:52 p.m.

Kenny Britt can't stop having knee surgeries.

Jim Wyatt of The Tennessean reported Tuesday that the Tennessee Titans wide receiver recently underwent arthroscopic surgery on his left knee. That's the second surgery in three months for Britt, who had follow-up surgery on his right knee earlier this offseason. During the 2011 season, Britt tore his anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament, which also required surgery.

The Titans later confirmed to The Associated Press that Britt underwent the procedure toward the end of June, following the team's minicamp.

It's fair to wonder if Britt will be ready for the 2012 season. He continues to suffer significant setbacks. (We don't want to hear about "minor" surgery.) It's also fair to wonder if he'll be the same explosive player he was at the beginning of last season and if he can stay healthy.

We've been talking up the Titans' offense as a sleeper unit this year, but it needs Britt on the field. It's uncertain when that will happen again.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:16 pm 
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Too injury riddled for my liking (maybe I'm thinking FF wise).

Paging Kendall Wright. They already said he learned all three WR positions in camp, if so thats very impressive.

Still hard to believe they won't say for sure if Locker can pass Hasselbeck. Last QB who sat out two years before playing that I remember is Steve McNair. FF wise Locker would be a beast, but his throwing accuracy issues scare me still.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:26 pm 
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Pennington, Rivers, Hasselbeck, Romo, and Aaron Rodgers all sat for 2+ seasons.

Locker is the exact type of player that should sit for another year.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:43 pm 
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Locker is the exact type of player that should sit for another year.


NOT if you spent a top 10 pick, thats idiotic.

Rivers and Rodgers had better vets ahead of them, Hasselbeck not so much.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:40 pm 
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Well, the Titans shouldn't have used a top 10 pick on Locker. But in terms of talent level, he shouldn't have been taken before pick #20 or whatever.

And this is the mistake that happens when you reach on a player, such as Locker. And now you're in a position where you have to play Locker a year earlier than you should because you reached on him. His talent level and rawness was such that he should have been picked between picks #25-32, but because of the Titans stupidity by taking him 15 slots too early, he'll be pressured to be a better player earlier than he should be.

Hasselbeck is not a great player, but he is a better QB at this point than Jake Locker. The Titans begin the season with 4 potential playoff teams: NE, at SD, DET, and at HOU. If they start the season with Locker, they'll be very lucky to win one of those games. If they start the season with Hasselbeck, they at least have a shot at being 2-2. If they start 0-4, then by all means turn the keys over to Locker.

Locker is not a pocket passer, and giving a 2nd year to really learn and grasp the offense could be exactly what he needs to develop that ability. Without that, he's going to wind up relying too much on his legs and thus lengthening and steepening his learning curve even further.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2012 11:57 am 
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but because of the Titans stupidity by taking him 15 slots too early, he'll be pressured to be a better player earlier than he should be.


Yeah I agree hear, its the rub they've created themselves. Ponder applies here too, although they don't have a vet bridge like Hasselbeck.

Good pt on those first four games, I didn't realize that. Prob is smarter to play MH if Locker still isn't ready. Most of this teams success this year to me, hinges on how hard CJ runs and potentially bounces back. I did read they feel better about their oline blocking this spring, as opposed to last year.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:09 pm 
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http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... or-titans/

Report: Jake Locker favored to start for Titans
Posted by Evan Silva on August 1, 2012, 10:56 AM EDT
Jake Locker AP

Incumbent starter Matt Hasselbeck and 2011 first-round pick Jake Locker are rotating first-team quarterback reps evenly at Titans camp. But there are growing indications that the organization is poised to go young. Hasselbeck is entering his age-37 season. Locker was the eighth overall selection in last year’s draft, and flashed explosive playmaking ability off the bench in rookie spot appearances.

NFL Network’s Mike Lombardi stated on Inside Training Camp Live that he’s “learned” Locker is the favorite to start over Hasselbeck. The Titans appear to have decided internally that the power-armed, athletic youngster is ready to start in the NFL after being eased in as a rookie.

Locker, of course, will need to avoid tanking in camp practices and preseason games in order to maintain what is probably still a loose grip on the lead position. But if Locker capitalizes on the promise he displayed as a rookie, Hasselbeck may never play another down as a Titan.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:16 pm 
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Boy, playing Locker sure would help CJ huh? All those boots would open up the run game like the Skins hope rg3 does, and how Vick helped our run game. I guess it will come back to, can Locker keep 8 out of the box or not? Also wonder if this helps TE Cook?

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:38 pm 
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Locker completed less than 52% of his passes last year. Hasselbeck completed nearly 62%. It's not going to be a recipe for success this year.

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 Post subject: NCAA is a joke
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 3:39 pm 
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Locker completed less than 52% of his passes last year.


That was about his ncaa % too. Its hard to get more accurate, you kinda either are or aren't. Usually motion, and moreso footwork are all that makes any progress. If he can't get more accurate they'll be drafting another qb in a year or two.

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 Post subject: Re: Kenny Britt can't catch a break
PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 3:16 pm 
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http://nflfilms.nfl.com/2012/08/10/cose ... tennessee/

Cosell Talks: Who will it be in Tennessee?
by Greg Cosell

The Tennessee Titans are fostering a very intriguing quarterback battle between 36-year-old veteran Matt Hasselbeck, entering his 14th NFL season, and 24-year-old Jake Locker, the eighth overall pick in the 2011 NFL Draft. Last season, Hasselbeck started all 16 games while leading the Titans to a 9-7 finish. Locker played in five games, throwing a total of 66 passes. The sample size of Locker’s pro production is limited, but it’s enough fodder for a meaningful evaluation of his abilities.

Hasselbeck is a proven commodity. He’s the kind of quarterback who must be watched, play after play, game after game, for one to truly appreciate his skill set. He certainly does not possess a big arm; even when he was in his prime, winning division titles and playoff games with the Seattle Seahawks, he was not driving the ball through the teeth of the coverage. Hasselbeck has always, first and foremost, based his game on recognition and awareness, on fully understanding both his own offense and the complexities of the defenses he plays against. He is a director, a manipulator, very discerning before the snap.

Quarterbacks with limited arm strength must compensate in two essential ways: with precise timing and exact ball location. Throughout his career, Hasselbeck has thrown with outstanding anticipation, releasing the ball before his receivers make their breaks. That’s one reason he has been so effective when throwing in the middle of the field at the intermediate levels, especially on seam throws. For years, Hasselbeck has also reliably and efficiently made one of the most difficult throws in football: a sideline throw to the outside void against defenses running Cover-2, behind the corner and before the deep safety can get there. Many strong-armed passers hesitate to try that throw. Successfully making it demands anticipation, touch and accuracy. Those have always been Hasselbeck’s best attributes.

Hasselbeck has also excelled in the red zone. He had the highest quarterback rating in the red zone of any 16-game starter last season, throwing 13 touchdown passes without a single interception there. To be efficient in that constricted area of the field, a quarterback must rely on pre-snap recognition and post-snap validation. He must also have the poise to manipulate and move defenders and the ability to speed up his tempo without sacrificing precise execution. This can’t be understated: Hasselbeck will score points in the red zone.

During the season, the only way to evaluate players is on a week-to-week basis; evaluating plays consecutively provides a completely different perspective. I took the opportunity this offseason to re-watch every one of Locker’s plays from 2011. I immediately noticed that Locker has a stronger arm than Hasselbeck. When his feet were set and his lower-body mechanics were balanced, he threw the ball with velocity. Locker’s delivery was compact, and he was able to snap throws off with arm speed and high RPMs. However, he also tended to rush his footwork in the pocket. That impacted his balance and led to accuracy issues, a flaw that has carried over from his days at the University of Washington.

Locker was occasionally impatient and indecisive in the pocket. His feet must be calmer; there was too much unnecessary movement. He was also quick to leave the pocket, playing slightly fast and frenetically. All this was to be expected from a quarterback who was not a natural pocket-passer. Locker has always been more comfortable and efficient outside of the pocket, and that proved to be true in all five games he played as a rookie. On a positive note, he threw the ball extremely well on the move, with velocity and more consistent accuracy than he showed from inside the pocket.

Locker can make throws outside the pocket, whether off boot action or improvisation; Hasselbeck cannot. Designed movement off play-action would fit well with the outside-zone running ability of Titans running back Chris Johnson. The goal of the perimeter zone run game is to stretch the defense on the front side and cut or seal the pursuit on the back side. A quarterback capable of getting on the edge by design can force back-side defenders to hold their positions for an extra beat. That leaves fewer players in pursuit, giving Johnson more space to cut back, one of his strengths as a runner. There’s no question Locker would allow that tactic to be more effective.

On the other hand, Hasselbeck is a much better pocket passer than Locker is currently. Hasselbeck would provide more stability and greater consistency. Most offensive coaches just want their game plans executed as intended. Hasselbeck, who is better at recognizing, adjusting and manipulating than Locker, would offer the Titans more continuity and greater certainty. Based on tape of him in college and from last season, Locker can be a bit undisciplined. Like many quarterbacks with excellent athletic ability and a history of making plays with their legs on Saturday afternoons, Locker has walked a fine line between following his playmaking instincts and leaving the pocket too early. The bottom line, though, is that in the NFL, quarterback is a pocket position. The traits that produce quality play from the pocket must be honed and sharpened if true consistency is to follow.

One other thing that stood out about Locker last season: He threw the ball much better to his right than to his left. He tended to open his front foot too much when he threw to his left, like a batter in baseball stepping into the bucket. That widened his base, diminishing his balance and lowering his arm slot. As would be expected, wildness resulted.

Locker has now gone through a full offseason program. He has the better arm. The question is how quickly he can grasp all the subtle nuances of consistent quarterback play. He can certainly be spectacular at times; we saw that last season. But the Titans, whose defense is a work in progress, need a quarterback who can sustain drives and convert on third down. Locker can make the highlight reels, but he must be able to make the small plays. How he progresses this offseason will be fascinating to watch.

For more thoughts by Greg Cosell, follow him on Twitter.
Published: August 10, 2012
Filed Under: Coach's tape, From the Desk of Greg Cosell, Greg Cosell, Tennessee Titans

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