Falcons 2005 Draft Recap


This is a collection of information on each Falcon draft pick that you can find on the internet. It is a collection from multiple on-line sources about each player, so that you know how each of the experts feel on each player.

Falcons 2005 Draft Picks

Round
Pick
Overall
Pos. Player
School
1
27
27
WR Roddy White
Alabama-Birmingham
2
27
59
DT Jonathan Babineaux
Iowa
3
27
90
LB Jordan Beck
California Polytechnic
4
27
128
DE Chauncey Davis
Florida State
5
24
160
LB Michael Boley
Southern Mississippi
5
27
163
OT Frank Omiyale
Tennessee Tech
6
27
201
RB DeAndra Cobb
Michigan State
7
27
241
DT Darrell Shropshire
South Carolina


Roddy White

property of UAB Sports.com

Height: 6'1"
Weight: 207
School: UAB
40 Time: 4.46

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Big play receiver with outstanding size/speed numbers. Fluid releasing off the line of scrimmage, quick footed and sells routes. Smooth and looks like he's gliding on the field. Easily adjusts to the deep reception running full speed, displays good eye/hand coordination and makes the difficult over-the-shoulder reception. Runs well laterally, lays out or extends for the difficult grab. Catches the pass away from his frame and effective running after the reception. Elusive, yet at the same time displays the ability to break tackles. Gets vertical to pull the ball out of the air.
NEGATIVES: Not a physical player and shies away from contact. Gives marginal effort blocking. Fast but does not show a second gear.
ANALYSIS: Consistently progressing on the college level, White possesses outstanding potential for the NFL and has all the tools to be a second receiver. Must learn to do the little things well and improve the physical nature of his game. Should be off the board during the second round in April.
PROJECTION: Early Second Round
NFL.com Analysis
Positives: Has a strong, athletic frame with long arms and legs, good overall muscle development, thin waist, wide shoulders and room for additional growth ... Long strider with above average quickness ... Has the second gear needed to run by and get on top of the defender ... Can set up the defenders with his fakes, stutter-step and ability to vary his speed ... Quick to tuck the ball away after the catch and does a nice job adjusting to the ball in flight ... His size and initial burst lets him beat the press coverage and dictate the route's progression ... His acceleration off the line allows him to gain yardage and run past defenders ... Runs quick vertical routes and shows the cutting ability upfield to separate ... Has good field vision, making proper body adjustments to the thrown ball ... Does a nice job of getting open and settling in the zone ... Shows good hands and looks natural extending for the ball outside the frame ... Very effective at playing the ball over his shoulders, especially on deep routes ... Combative going for the ball in traffic and will not hesitate to make the catch with a defender all over him ... Has the body control to get into position and has the burst to make the big play once he finds the crease in the zone ... Times his leaps well and shows a good feel for markers and boundaries.
Negatives: Does not separate on the hard angle cuts well, as he's more of a soft angle receiver ... Has a little bit of a poor stance, and when he stands too tall, his release limits him in this area (exposes his chest too much releasing) causing him to struggle some vs. the jam, but he closes the cushion quickly ... Despite his quickness, he does gather himself to take off, but shows good explosion and is a determined runner after the catch ... Because he plays at such a high pad level, he struggles on short area routes as he fails to properly drop his weight and gain separation ... Is such a marginal blocker that he is generally removed from the field during running plays ... It is not because of a lack of strength that he does not block well, but rather a lack of desire ... More of a straight-line runner, as he does not run crisp routes, drop his hips and separate out of his cuts ... More of a soft angle type that will round his cuts and shuffle his feet ... Lacks elusiveness after the catch because of hip stiffness and marginal change of direction agility (needs to have a crease to make the big play)

Rob Rang of NFL Draft Scout
SUMMARY: A two-time All-State selection at Saint James High, he holds all of his prep school's receiving records. He played in nine games as a true freshman at UAB, starting three times as he caught 14 passes for 235 yards & a pair of scores. He led the team with 39 catches for 580 yards & 3 TDs as a sophomore in 2002, adding 34 yards on 3 kickoffs & 14 yards on a punt return. He again led the squad with 39 receptions for 844 yards (21.7 avg) & 7 TDs in 2003. Despite his timed speed, he's not a burner down field & is not going to blow by cornerbacks, but he has more than enough power & leg drive to break arm tackles. He can set up the defenders with his fakes, stutterstep & ability to vary his speed. He does not separate on the hard angle cuts well, as he's more of a soft angle receiver, though. He can set up the opponent with his double move & is very dependable getting behind the cornerbacks. He gives it his all each play, goes all out when he 's a decoy or a blocker, will finish each play & shows the ability to pluck & extend for the ball. He is quick to tuck the ball away after the catch & does a nice job adjusting to the ball well in flight, making the tough catch look routine. He competes and will run into traffic to make the catch, along with giving up his body & has good initial quickness. He does have a little bit of a poor stance and when he stands too tall, his release limits him in this area (exposes his chest too much releasing), but he closes the cushion quickly. He has the ability to create space up field. Despite needing some pattern refinement, he seems to have a good concept of the passing game. He gathers himself to take off, but shows good explosion & is a determined runner after the catch, with a quick take off. He will go inside, take a hit in the face & still hang on to the ball. He really sells his routes well, especially with his ability to get behind the defender. While he may be better suited for the slot in a multiple receiver set, he also has enough talent to line up at flanker. He's considered a mid-round pick, but if 2004 is an improvement over 2003, he will slip into the first day draft picture. COMPARES TO: ROD SMITH-Denver.
Drew Boylhart of The Huddle Report
Strengths: Roddy has good size and strength for his position. He catches the ball with his hands and will fight for the ball when it's in the air. He runs good routes for his level of play and uses his body to get position to make the catch. Roddy has very good run after the catch ability and is difficult to bring down in the open field. He has the strength and quickness to counter a jam at the line. Roddy has good instincts and he has the potential to be a #1 WR for the team that drafts him because he is smart and has good athletic ability.
Needs to Improve: First, Roddy has to learn not to challenge coaches in the middle of a game because he disagrees with a coaching decision. Then, Roddy has to learn to run routes much better than he runs them now. There is no doubt that Roddy needs to mature and realize that he is not yet as good a WR as he thinks he is.
Bottom Line: The question is, does Roddy want to be a #1 WR for the team that drafts him or will he be satisfied with the money and responsibility of a #2 WR? If you take him in the 2nd round, he will have time to discover this and the team that drafts him should get a pretty good WR while he decides. If you take Roddy in the first round, you just might be putting him into a situation mentally that he cannot handle and you could get burned. I know Roddy wants to win and that's very important, but does he realize how much hard work is ahead of him to become a #1 WR in the NFL? I think at this point, he thinks he knows, but I think he is in for a shock. Roddy has the talent and if he is taken in the 2nd or 3rd round, I think that will be good. If you take him in the 1st you had better do your homework and bring him along slowly because he has excellent potential, but the pressure could bury him. It is pressure that he has no idea is coming his way and at this point, I believe he is not ready for.
Joseph Coaty of Tha Pack
Roddy White entered his senior season carrying a solid day two grade, but a strong performance in 2004 should move White up into day one of the 2005 NFL Draft. White played as a true freshman in 2001, and posted solid statistics as a sophomore in 2002. He had a breakthrough season as a junior, catching 39 passes for 844 yards (a 21.6-yard per catch average) and 7 touchdowns. White earned national recognition as a senior, hauling in 72 passes for 1452 yards (a 20.5-yard per catch average) and 14 touchdowns. White has a good size/speed combination. He has a good wide receiver build and has legitimate NFL deep speed. He also has pretty good hands and can adjust and make the tough catch. On the downside, White still needs additional work at running routes and should be a better blocker than he currently is. Unfortunately, White was a disappointment at the Indianapolis Combine, only measuring in at about 6-1 and not running the 40-yard dash. White is a solid prospect, but I personally believe that he is a slightly over-rated prospect whose true value lies in the late second/third round area of the draft.
D.J. Boyer of Draft.com
Strength: Deep passing threat. Weakness: Beating zone coverage
Stat Line: 71 catches for 1,452 yards and 14 touchdowns as a senior.
Hands: Hands are inconsistent but White adjusts to balls well in the air. Speed: Does not show a quick burst in and out of cuts but he is nearly unstoppable going downfield or when beating man coverage. Route Running: Needs to be sharper in and out of cuts. Has the ability to beat any corner deep at the Division I-A level.
Analysis: Statistically Roddy White may have had the most outstanding year of any wide receiver in Division I-A football in 2004. White showed big play flair back in 2003 when he caught 39 balls for a 21.6 YPC average. This season White doubled his catches with 71 and his average yards per catch was still over 20 at 20.5 YPC. White has good but not great size and the same can be said for his speed. Is tricky off the line of scrimmage because he can get separation by making a move or being physical and avoid being jammed at the line of scrimmage. Uses hands well while blocking and has a nice and smooth running motion. Has proven to be very durable and can go across the middle of the field. Tweaked his hamstring a bit at The Senior Bowl but that will not stop him from being a first or second round selection.

Brian DeLucia of Ourlads.com
After emerging as UAB's top receiving threat as a junior in 2003, White exploded and become a premier wideout in the college ranks in 2004. White hauled in 71 passes for 1,452 yards and 14 touchdowns, becoming a threat to score at any time. With decent size and amazing speed, he is an athletic playmaker with a nose for the big play. He uses his speed to get separation and stretch the field. Also, his soft hands and ability to adjust to the ball are invaluable in traffic. White is adept at getting open, but he isn't creative after the catch. He has excellent speed but needs to improve his route running and blocking skills. Although White is not big and not much of a blocker, his physical tools are rather impressive overall. He needs to do the little things to advance his career, like adding weight and muscle, and refining his route running skills and blocking. If he does, he should be a productive number two receiver in the NFL.
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Has excellent speed and quickness...Has a decent size and frame...Very athletic and adjusts to the ball well...Physical player...Has good hands and uses them well...A threat to score at anytime...Does a nice job getting open...A big play threat and a playmaker.
Weaknesses: Has been mostly just a deep threat in college and may be a bit....Needs to work on his route running...Isn't a great blocker...Doesn't really create after the catch...Probably not as big as his school lists him.
Notes: A bit of a sleeper whose stock is on the rise...Has some impressive physical tools and his big play ability is exciting...Not a finished product but has been very productive and teams will love his playmaking ability.
Allen Trieu of NFL Draft Showcase
White is a big, sturdy target who has been productive throughout his collegiate career. For a bigger target, he has really good deep speed. He doesn't have the quickest first step, but once he gets going, he's able to run by defenders. When the ball is in the air, the does a nice job of going after it and he catches the ball with his hands. He does have some moments where his focus wanes and he'll drop a ball, but for the most part, his hands are solid. One area where he can improve is route running, his routes tend to be a little sloppy and he could work on sharpening his breaks. His release is only average for a player his size, and he needs to do a better with his hands and with getting off the line quicker. He has great strength and downfield blocking should be one area that he excels in, although he doesn't always dominate his man like he is capable of doing.
Overall: White has the tools to become a go to receiver at the NFL level. He needs to refine his game but he has the athleticism teams look for. He should go no later than the mid 2nd Round and could go as high as the early 20s.
Greg Benjamin of On The Clock Draft
Roddy White has a great deal of experience as a wide receiver for UAB, having been a contributor for them since his true freshman season when he had 236 receiving yards and returned kicks on special teams. He had a breakout season in 2002 and has become one of the most feared deep threats in the nation, averaging over 20 yards per reception in each of the past two seasons and 19 yards per reception for his career. His 95 yard touchdown reception against Cincinnati in 2003 was the second longest reception in Conference USA history. He has pretty good size but could stand to add about 5-10 pounds of bulk. He doesn't have a quick first step off the line, but he makes up for that with great overall speed. He has pretty good hands--He makes a lot of great catches but can be a little inconsistent at times. He does a good job of adjusting to the ball while it is in the air. He is a physical receiver and a tough player who will go over the middle and does a good job of catching the ball in traffic. He is a very talented player but isn't a polished receiver. He needs to work on running more precise routes and improve his blocking skills to become a more complete receiver. He has proven to be a very durable player over the course of his career. He hasn't had any major injuries and he has been able to play through the few minor ones he has had. He was having a pretty good Senior Bowl week until he injured his groin and was forced to miss the remaining practices as well as the game. He is one of the best "home run" threats in the draft but is still raw as a receiver. He should be a late first or early second round pick on draft day.
Robert Davis of Football's Future
Roddy White doesn't seem to gain a lot of attention for what he has done on the field, but he has been very productive at Alabama Birmingham. He moved into the starting lineup his sophomore season and he ended up with 39 catches for 580 yards and 3 touchdowns. He upped his numbers as a junior, going for 39 grabs for 844 yards and 7 touchdowns. This past season he truly broke out however. As a senior, White posted career highs across the board with 71/1452/14. White has a great size to speed ratio. At 6'1 and over 200lbs, White brings great straight-line speed and the ability to get behind the defense for the big play. Defenses know he's going deep and they still are unable to stop him from making plays. He's athletic and can go up and get the ball in the air down field. Even though he has put up big numbers, he's still a bit of a project. He does not run sharp routes, and can be a little inconsistent catching the football. He relies more on his natural ability at this point, but he's not going to be able to just run by NFL corners. Even though he has great speed over a distance, he does not have a great burst off the line or in and out of cuts. He needs time to pick up his speed. White has an impressive package of skills, but he has work to do. Whoever drafts him will need to show some patience and allow him to fully develop before expecting big things out of him. If given proper coaching and time, White has a lot of upside at the next level. He looks like a borderline first rounder at this point. If there is a run on WR's in the top 20, his stock could be pushed up some on draft day.
Dan Pompei of The Sporting News
Big guy who plays big. Can beat the jam. Was a high school wrestling champion, and plays like it. Brings a physical dimension. Tenacious blocker. Is not concerned about exposing himself to defenders. Excellent red-zone weapon. Has sneaky speed. Hands are pretty good, but will drop an easy one from time to time. Makes catches away from his body. Is not the smoothest route-runner. Shows good body control.

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Jonathan Babineaux

property of Hawkeye Sports.com

Height: 6'2"
Weight: 286
School: Iowa
40 Time: 4.87

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Explosive tackle quick in all aspects of the game. Immediately gets off the snap with a great first step, plays with leverage as well as exceptional balance. Gets a good amount of momentum going up the field, displays a burst of speed and runs well. Good hand technique getting off blocks as well as a solid arm-over move. Wedges through opponents, quickly locates the ball and goes hard. Consistently around the action making positive plays. Outstanding in pursuit, chasing to get involved in the action and rarely off his feet.
NEGATIVES: Undersized, driven off the line of scrimmage by big blockers or engulfed at the point.
ANALYSIS: An athletic defensive line prospect who lacks the pure height for end and size on the interior, Babineaux possesses the skills to be used in a variety of systems. Best in a one-gap scheme, preferably lined up next to a wide body. Should also be productive as a three-technique lineman. A worthy top-45 pick in April.
PROJECTION: Mid Second Round
NFL.com Analysis
Babineaux is shorter than ideal and lacks the bulk you look for in a two-gap tackle. His low center of gravity, active hands, sudden burst off the snap, and timed speed help him compensate. He is an explosive athlete with the quickness to possibly play defensive end at the pro level. He is a quick-twitch type who can gain an instant edge at the snap and shows the burst to shoot the gaps and disrupt the plays in the backfield. He is a very productive run defender who can also be an effective pass rusher. He is quick to get his hands up to generate a push off the blocker and has enough functional strength to push the offensive guard back into the pocket when he fires off the snap low. When he gets too high in his stance, he fails to pick up the low blocks and struggles to keep the opponent off his feet. However, he is usually quick to get on an edge of a blocker and when he pushes the pocket, he will generally collapse it and finish the play. He has a good feel for blocks and reacts well to blocking pressure in his attempts to locate the ball. His low center of gravity helps him create a lane to the quarterback. Despite his size limitations, he can hold his ground at the point of attack and is adequate splitting double teams. He is very tough to move off the line, as he has the speed to slip off blocks and the strength to hold his ground. When he maintains inside hand control, Babineaux is very effective at stacking blocks. He can throw and jerk the offensive linemen off balance with his strong hands and stays on his feet in attempts to disengage. He shows good snap reaction and is very effective working on stunts and twists thanks to his lower body strength and explosion off the ball. When in pursuit, he is quick to flush the quarterback out of the pocket. He is a highly motivated sort and respected field general who has been a member of the team's leadership council since his junior year. He is a smart player, but just gets by in the classroom. He shows good knee bend, hip snap and body control to gain position, keeping his hands inside and his pad level down to be disruptive attacking the gaps. His lateral agility and foot speed allow him to slide down the line to string plays out. Some teams might show a bit of concern with his two leg fractures, but he showed in 2004 that he is capable of producing big numbers when healthy. For a team looking for a quick under-tackle, this is the player that could fill that need. Despite his size limitations, Babineaux is very capable of driving the offensive linemen backwards as a bull rusher. His speed and strength more than make up for a lack of size and bulk.
Rob Rang of NFL Draft Scout
SUMMARY: Jonathan was a standout performer for the Lincoln (Port Arthur, Tex.) High School team, where he was coached by present Iowa assistant Carl Jackson. Babineaux competed as a linebacker, defensive end, punter and fullback. He was a member of the school's top-ranked basketball team in the state of Texas and also lettered in baseball. A first team All-Conference linebacker and team captain as a senior, Jonathan also handled punting duties (40.0 avg). He comes from a loving and large family. He was raised by his mother and has a younger brother, Jordan, who is a strong safety for the Seattle Seahawks. Babineaux was an immediate contributor upon arriving at Iowa in 2000. He played in eleven games, starting vs. Ohio State, Wisconsin and Penn State as a fullback that year, but only carried once for a 4-yard gain and made two catches for 12 yards. A right tibia fracture during 2001 spring drills would keep him on the sidelines for the season. In 2002, he moved to the defensive tackle position, starting the first eleven games on the weak-side before missing the Minnesota contest due to the death of his grandfather. Jonathan managed to record 53 tackles (31 solos) with seven sacks, nine stops behind the line of scrimmage, nine quarterback pressures, two forced fumbles and an interception during that campaign. He started the first seven games of the 2003 season, but tore ligaments in his ankle and again fractured his right tibia early in the Ohio State clash, missing the team's final six contests. He finished that year with 23 tackles (12 solos), a sack and five stops behind the line of scrimmage. 2004 was his finest season, as Babineaux not only earned All-American and All-Big Ten Conference honors, but was also named the team's Defensive MVP. In his final year, he collected 55 tackles (41 solos), as he led the Big Ten and ranked eleventh in the nation with eleven sacks, led the conference and ranked second in the nation with 25 stops behind the line of scrimmage, registered twelve pressures with three fumble recoveries and three forced fumbles. His 25 stops for losses also set a school season-record. Jonathan played in 42 games for the Hawkeyes, including 32 contests on defense. He recorded 131 tackles (84 solos) with 19 sacks for minus 99 yards, 39 stops for losses of 151 yards, 24 quarterback pressures, four fumble recoveries, five forced fumbles, an interception and two pass deflections. Babineaux than is shorter than ideal and lacks the bulk you look for in a two-gap tackle, but his low center of gravity, active hands, sudden burst off the snap and timed speed help him compensate. He is an explosive athlete with the quickness to possibly play defensive end at the pro level. He is a quick-twitch type who can gain an instant edge at the snap and shows the burst to shoot the gaps and disrupt the plays in the backfield. Jonathan is a very productive run defender who can also be an effective pass rusher. He is quick to get his hands up to generate a push off the blocker and has enough functional strength to push the offensive guard back into the pocket when he fires off the snap low. When he gets too high in his stance, he fails to pick up the low blocks and struggles to keep the opponent off his feet. However, he is usually quick to get on an edge of a blocker and when he pushes the pocket, he will generally collapse it and finish the play. He has a good feel for blocks and reacts well to blocking pressure in his attempts to locate the ball. His low center of gravity helps Jonathan create a lane to the quarterback. Despite his size limitations, he can hold his ground at the point of attack and is adequate splitting double teams. He is very tough to move off the line, as he has the speed to slip off blocks and the strength to hold his ground. When he maintains inside hand control, Babineaux is very effective at stacking blocks. He can throw and jerk the offensive linemen off balance with his strong hands and stays on his feet in attempts to disengage. Jonathan shows good snap reaction and is very effective working on stunts and twists, thanks to his lower body strength and explosion off the ball. When in pursuit, he is quick to flush the quarterback out of the pocket. He is a highly motivated sort and respected field general who has been a member of the team's leadership council since his junior year. Babineaux is a smart player, but just gets by in the classroom (1.99 gpa). He shows good knee bend, hip snap and body control to gain position, keeping his hands inside and his pad level down to be disruptive attacking the gaps. His lateral agility and foot speed allow him to slide down the line to string plays out. Some teams might show a bit of concern with his two leg fractures, but he showed in 2004 that he is capable of producing big numbers when healthy. For a team looking for a quick under- tackle, this is the player that could fill that need. Despite his size limitations, Jonathan is very capable of driving the offensive linemen backwards as a bull rusher.His speed and strength more than make up for a lack of size and bulk. COMPARES TO: CHRIS HOVAN-Minnesota (more like the Hovan from earlier in his career, not the Hovan that has been a mediocre performer in 2003-04).
Drew Boylhart of The Huddle Report
Strengths: Jonathan is a strong, powerful kid with excellent quickness and good speed. He is a team player and an excellent pass rusher. He is strong in the college game against the run and has excellent football instincts. He is an impact player for his team and will be a core player and fan favorite for the team that drafts him. Jonathan is the type of player that does not need to be on the field for every down to impact the game. He shows leadership qualities and makes the players around him better.
Needs to Improve: Jonathan will have to find a position at the next level. His size does not lend itself to the DT position in the NFL. I have no doubts that he will accomplish this and still be an impact player on special teams as he works to find the right position in the NFL. Changing and finding a position will affect his draft status, but Jonathan has 1st round athleticism that will impact at the next level.
Bottom Line: Jonathan has the talent to be a DE or a 1-gap DT, maybe even a MLB. I bet when he gets to the combine, that some smart team will work him out at FB and even TE. My advice to the 32 teams in this draft...don't worry about what position Jonathan will play, worry about making sure your team drafts the kid. Jonathan loves to play football and that is it in a nutshell. (I'm in a nutshell. How did I get in this nutshell?!) Jonathan reminds me of Dan Klecko when he came out. These are players that you need on your team to be a playoff of Super Bowl team. They add toughness, character and a whole lot of unusual and hidden talent to your squad. They can help you stuff the run or rush the passer. They can also be your leader on special teams. Jonathan might end up as an MLB in the end or a DE/OLB. He could go as high as the 2nd round or in the 4th round. Me personally, I would take him no later than the 3rd round. I just hope my favorite team drafts him, that's all I can say!
Joseph Coaty of Tha Pack
Positives: Has excellent athletic ability for a defensive tackle. Runs well and has good change of direction ability. Uses his hands well and can get in the backfield and make plays.
Negatives: Lacks great size and can get pushed around in the running game. May never develop into a great player if he cannot bulk up. Has had some injury problems in the past.
Overall analysis: While he does not appear to be the prototype for an NFL defensive tackle, Jonathan Babineaux has great upside potential and could turn out to be one of the best defensive tackles in the 2005 NFL Draft. Babineaux played linebacker, defensive end and fullback in high school, and played the fullback position for Iowa during the 2000 season. He missed the 2001 season after suffering a broken leg during the spring drills. Babineaux moved to the defensive side of the ball and started in 12 games during the 2002 season, finishing the season with 7 sacks. Many expected Babineaux to have an even bigger year in 2003, but unfortunately he broke his ankle 7 games into the season. However, Babineaux did return as a senior and had the breakout season that many had anticipated him having during his junior year. He finished the 2004 season with an impressive 55 tackles, 11 sacks and 25 tackles for loss. Babineaux is an outstanding athlete for an interior defensive lineman. He runs well, can change directions, is very quick and has very good agility. He also uses his hands well and finds his way into the opponent's backfield with great frequency. However, Babineaux lacks great size and can get pushed around in the running game. And the fact that Babineaux has missed significant time with injury is always a cause for concern. Babineaux has great upside potential, but he is only built for certain systems and will likely need to add some size, without losing any of his athleticism, if he is going to develop into a top NFL defensive tackle. With his outstanding senior season, Babineaux has elevated his grade to a solid second round status.
D.J. Boyer of Draft.com
Strength: Hand placement. Weakness: Durability
Stat Line: 55 tackles with 25 for loss and 11 sacks in 2004.
Pass rush: Relentless pass rusher who had 11 sacks and narrowly missed another 7-8. Run support: Shows good lower body strength for a smaller tackle and for a person who has suffered two serious injuries below the waistline. Speed/Tackling: One of the fastest players available at defensive tackle but there is more to his overall game than just speed.
Analysis: Seemed to live in the backfield of the opposing team all season, nearly half of his registered tackles went for losses. Babineaux is a player that I am not quite as high on even though he has the statistics to support being a day 1 selection. Babineaux has missed the better part of two seasons because of major injuries (2001 and 2003). A broken leg and a broken ankle are to blame for the time off for Babineaux but he continues to show good leg drive despite his injury riddled past. Could use some work in refining his power moves while rushing the quarterback but overall Babineaux is a solid prospect that can fit in a number of different defensive schemes despite his small size.
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Very good speed and quickness...Good motor...Athletic...Mobile and seems to have good instincts...Penetrator who can make in impact as a pass rusher.
Weaknesses: Undersized...Durability is a big concern after suffering two major leg injuries during his career...Doesn't display great technique...A liability against the run.
Notes: One-gap DT prospect...Former defensive end who is considered a 'tweener...Could be a factor as a 3-4 DE at the next level.
Joey Schalk of Draft Crazy
Positives: Is extremely disruptive and very athletic. Makes plays all over the backfield and generates a good pass rush. Has produced eight sacks his senior year and 20 tackles for loss. Is a true playmaker who plays hard.
Negatives: Lack of size will be a problem in the NFL. He may get manhandled by stronger interior linemen. Has decent speed, but doesn't have the quickness to rush from the outside.
Bottom Line: Babineaux is tough to project. He will make plays, but lack of true position may cause him to drop. He will need to add weight to become a full-time starter, but will be on the field in passing situations either way. A team that places an emphasis on speed and penetration will be his best shot to produce.
Allen Trieu of NFL Draft Showcase
Babineaux is a high motor player who is a bit of a tweener. He is very quick off the snap of the ball. He fires out low and plays with good leverage and technique. He shows good athleticism and good feet. He lacks size and strength though. He can be blocked by a single lineman and is more of a penetrator than a player who can consistently anchor and hold his ground. He does have good balance and has an effective swim move. He does a good job with his hands and keeps blockers off his body, he shows decent ability to shed blockers if he is enagaged. He is a great interior pass rusher and shows a knack for getting to the QB. Babineaux does a good job of not quitting on plays, he shows good ability to track down ball carriers and has decent straight line speed for a lineman. The main problem with Babineaux is his lack of a position. His most effective position will probably be as a 3-4 DE. If he is to play inside in a 4-3, he will have to add bulk and strength.
Overall: Babineaux is a tweener, but he's a really good athlete and a hustler and that will get him far in the NFL. He'll have to go to the right team, but those teams know who they are and know who he is. Babineaux should enjoy a nice NFL career, even though he might not ever be a Pro Bowl type. He could go late in the 2nd Round and shouldn't fall out of the 3rd.
Greg Benjamin of On The Clock Draft
Johnathan Babineaux began his career at Iowa primarily as a reserve fullback as a freshman in 2000. A broken leg in spring practice the following year sidelined Babineaux for the entire season. He was awarded a medical redshirt for that season, giving him an extra year of eligibility. He had a breakout season in 2002, recording 53 tackles, seven sacks and an interception in eleven starts at defensive end. He moved over to defensive tackle in 2003 and started seven games before suffering a knee injury which sidelined him for the rest of the season. He came back with a strong senior campaign, racking up 55 tackles and eleven sacks. Babineaux finished his career in outstanding fashion with seven tackles and three sacks against the LSU Tigers in the Captial One Bowl. He doesn't have ideal size for the defensive tackle position, but he makes up for his lack of size with his speed and quickness. He was timed at 4.83 seconds in the 40 at the combine, one of the better times among all defensive linemen. If he fails to beat an opponent off the snap of the ball with his speed, he can get manhandled at times. He would benefit from increasing his strength so he can better fight off blocks of some of the lager guards in the NFL. He has the speed and athleticism to be an effective pass rusher or chase the running back down from behind in the backfield. Babineaux is a bit of a DE/DT "Tweener". Where he plays in the NFL will most likely depend on what team drafts him. He would be an ideal candidate to play defensive end in a 3-4 defensive scheme, but he will most likely be a one-gap defensive tackle in a 4-3. His injury history should be a cause for concern. He missed nearly a year and a half of action in college due to injury. He should still be a first day pick and he could go as high as the second round but the injury problems will most likely push him back to round three in April's draft.
Dan Pompei of The Sporting News
Athletic; ran a 4.87 40-yard dash at the Combine. Is a penetrator who uses quickness and explosion. First step is a killer. Can burst to finish the play. Was very productive. Does not have ideal size. Strictly a one-gap tackle. Also could be a defensive end.

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Jordan Beck

property of Go Poly.com

Height: 6'2"
Weight: 233
School: Cal Poly
40 Time: 4.46

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Tough, active linebacker constantly around the ball. Quick to diagnose the action, instinctive and takes good angles to the play. Efficient, plays sideline-to-sideline and excels in coverage. Gets depth on drops, easily runs with opposing tight ends or backs and displays solid ball skills. Outstanding leader on the defense. Works hard in run defense and sacrifices his body to make the play.
NEGATIVES: Undersized and swallowed up at the point. Slowed through the trash laterally and easily knocked off balance by the initial block.
ANALYSIS: A productive collegian four years running, Beck possesses the physical and mental make-up to play at the next level. Has the underlying athletic skills to project to the weak-side yet his penchant to snuff out running plays also makes Beck a good fit on the inside of a 34 alignment. Moving up draft boards after a terrific combine performance.
PROJECTION: Late Third Round
NFL.com Analysis
Beck plays hard, shows very good range and is a hit-and-wrap type of tackler who can generate enough pop on contact. He is a smart athlete who makes decent reads and is quick to react to blocking schemes and formations. He has the sudden burst to slip blocks on the move and is very active working down the line. He made good strides in 2004 as a blitzer, as his rover time allowed him to be uncovered more often, giving him a free lane to make the play behind the line of scrimmage. He needs to do a better job of using his hands, as he lacks ideal size and strength to face up and disengage when taking blockers head on. His marginal change-of-direction skills are evident in pass coverage, as he gathers himself in transition, forcing him to take bad angles and miss tackles trying to recover. Beck is better playing in the short zone, where he shows better awareness making plays in front of him. He is not an effective tackler in space, as he does not open his hips properly or show enough flexibility. He also struggles to use his hands effectively to prevent blockers from attacking his knees. Still, you notice that he has been highly productive making the clutch plays. He will sometimes take on blockers with the wrong shoulder, which can result in getting stonewalled. He needs to improve his overall strength, as Beck can not be considered a knock-back tackler, especially since he tends to make too many low tackles working near the pile. Before 2003, he was not really an effective blitzer, but he developed better timing and anticipation skills to combine with his speed to create the lane needed to get to the quarterback in the pocket. The thing you have to like about Beck is his quickness, high motor and burst on the blitz. However, he needs to show better anticipation skills in pass coverage and must improve his power base, as he lacks strength to stack and control. The level of competition he faced was marginal, but he has produced good numbers. For a team looking for a Cover-2 linebacker or one to play on the weak side, they could find a nice late round project in this player. He might be like Rodney Daingerfield (gets no respect) in some scouts' eyes, but based on his speed and production to date, he is capable of contributing at the next level.
Rob Rang of NFL Draft Scout
SUMMARY: Jordan was an All-League defensive back, wide receiver and punter at San Lorenzo Valley (Cal.) High School, adding All-State honorable mention on defense as a senior. He was recruited as a receiver for Cal Poly, but ended up appearing in ten games as a middle linebacker as a freshman. Beck earned All-Independent honors that year, as he led the team with 73 tackles (48 solos), including 2.5 sacks and seven stops for losses. He was again an All-Independent pick at middle line- backer in 2002, posting a team-high 113 tackles (62 solos), 4.5 sacks and 13 stops behind the line of scrimmage. Jordan added Independent Defensive Player of the Year honors after registering 128 tackles (68 solos) with four sacks, 13 stops for losses, a 41-yard fumble recovery and four pass break-ups in 2003. The middle linebacker experimented at the Rover position during the 2004 preseason and also saw action there during the course of the year. 2004 proved to be a banner season for Beck, as he was a consensus All-American, unanimous All-Great West Conference and Defensive Player of the Year and recipient of the Buck Buchanan Award, given to the top defender in the NCAA Division 1-AA ranks. He led the team in tackles for the fourth-straight year with 135 (97) and his 449 tackles set a school career-record, shattering the previous mark of 326 by Gary Swanson (1981-84). His 135 tackles ranked fourth in the nation and his 18.5 stops behind the line of scrimmage ranked seventh. He also made 5.5 sacks, intercepted four passes, returning two for touchdowns, caused six fumbles and deflected nine passes. Beck comes from a supportive, sports-oriented family, as his father, Randy, played football at UCLA and his mother, Terry, competed as a swimmer. Jordan is the type of player that plays hard, shows very good range and is a hit-&-wrap type of tackler who can generate enough pop on contact. He is a smart athlete who makes decent reads and is quick to react to blocking schemes and formations. He has the sudden burst to slip blocks on the move and is very active working down the line. He has made good strides in 2004 as a blitzer, as his time playing Rover allowed him to be uncovered more often, giving him a free lane to make the play behind the line of scrimmage. He needs to do a better job of using his hands, as he lacks ideal size and strenth to face up and disengage when taking blockers head on. His marginal change of direction skills are evident in pass coverage, as he gathers himself in transition, forcing him to take bad angles and miss tackles trying to recover. He is better playing in the short zone, where he shows better awareness making plays in front of him. He is not an effective tackler in space, as he does not open his hips properly or show enough flexibility. He also struggles to use his hands effectively to prevent blockers from attacking his knees. Still, you notice that he has been highly productive making the clutch plays. He will sometimes take on blockers with the wrong shoulder, resulting in Beck getting stonewalled on the play. He needs to improve his overall strength, as Jordan can not be considered a knock back tackler, especially since he tends to make too many low tackles working near the pile. Before 2003, he was not really an effective blitzer, but he developed better timing and anticipation skills to combine with his speed to create the lane needed to get to the quarterback in the pocket. The thing you have to like about Beck is his quickness, high motor and burst on the blitz. However, he needs to show better anticipation skills in pass coverage and must improve his power base, as he lacks strength to stack and control. The level of competition he faced was marginal, but he has produced good numbers. For a team looking for a cover-two linebacker or one to play on the weak-side, they could find a nice late round project in this player. He might be like Rodney Daingerfield (gets no respect) in some scouts' eyes, but based on his speed and production to date, I feel he is very capable of contributing at the next level. COMPARES TO: DONNIE EDWARDS-San Diego (both rely on their sudden quickness to get to and make plays around the ball).
D.J. Boyer of Draft.com
Strength: Causing turnovers. Weakness: Overpursuit
Stat Line: 135 tackles with 18.5 for loss with 4 interceptions and 6 forced fumbles as a senior.
Pass rush: Is more of a rover at the linebacker position but he can rush the quarterback when asked. Run support: Not the most sound and technical tackler in the world but he has the speed and lateral movment to cover a lot of ground and get the job done. Speed/Tackling: Clocked faster than a number of wide receivers and running backs when it came to 40-yard dash time.
Analysis: Jordan Beck still needs to learn the finer and more technical points about the game but he has gone about as far as you can go on raw talent and instinct at Cal-Poly. Fastest of the linebackers available on the outside and is very strong for being a smaller prospect. Is moving up fast as we near the draft and could now be selected during the first day of the festivities. Stops on a dime and has improved upon his separation skills and disengaging at the line of scrimmage.
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Has been an outstanding player and extremely productive since his true freshman season...Has excellent speed...Very smart and has great instincts...Makes plays sideline-to-sideline all over the field...Is a playmaker.
Weaknesses: Didn't play against a top level of competition...Lacks the ideal size you look for...Struggles to fight through traffic...Doesn't look real natural in coverage.
Notes: Won the 2004 Buck Buchanan Award given to the nation's defensive player of the year in Division I-AA...May have to move outside at the pro level.

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Chauncey Davis

property of War Chant.com

Height: 6'2"
Weight: 273
School: Florida State
40 Time: 4.78

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Athletic edge-rushing prospect with size limitations. Plays with forward lean, balance, and body control. Moves well laterally stringing plays out to the flanks, rarely off his feet and displays a burst of speed bearing down on the action. Quickly changes direction, redirects to ballcarriers or adjusts to the play.
NEGATIVES: Undersized and easily walled from the play by blockers. Has difficulty shedding once engaged at the point. Not quick locating the ball. Tends to put his head down and do a lot of bulrushing up the field. Must take wide angles around opponents.
ANALYSIS: A small college defensive end, Davis has possibilities as a rush linebacker in a 34 defense at the next level. Reminds us of former Seminole Alonzo Jackson and at best a situational player in the NFL.
PROJECTION: Undrafted Free Agent
NFL.com Analysis
Davis is a quiet, respectful sort with a good work ethic. He needs a few reps to retain new plays, but will quickly utilize what he has learned. He is an undersized defensive end, but has good athletic agility and quickness. He is built more in the lines of a 3-4 linebacker and could possibly shift to that position in the pros because of the speed that he generates coming off the edge and the agility he shows dropping back in space. Davis relies mostly on that quickness, as he still needs to dedicate hours in the weight room to improve his strength. He lacks the stoutness needed to hold up against the bigger offensive tackles and does get knocked around quite a bit at the point of attack. He is best when making plays on the move. He is not as effective a tackler when he has to pick a side as he is when he comes from behind or meets the ballcarrier head on. When Davis is able to slant and jump around blocks, he can make plays against the run and does an effective job freeing himself up on stunts. He has good lateral agility to pursue plays down the line. He is sometimes slow to react to the play, as he needs to see the "big picture" before he will attack the ball. Chauncey is a decent tackler that will deliver some pop, but he is also prone to over pursuit the and needs to show better stop-and-go action. On the pass rush, he is more effective when he uses his speed to beat the blocker off the snap or knife inside with his rip move. Davis needs to improve his hand usage, as he struggles to get off blocks and allows the tackles to get their hands into his chest too often. He has the flexibility to dip back and reach the edge because of his speed, but gets tied up because he fails to generate the hand extension needed to push off. He can flatten down the line due to his quickness and change-of-direction agility, showing nice effort in pursuit. Davis can fit inside when tackling, but will get out of control. He relies on his speed too much coming off the edge, and while he has the flexibility to bend and dip back, he does not show a good feel as a pass rusher.
Rob Rang of NFL Draft Scout
Chauncey was an All-State linebacker and running back at Auburndale (Fla.) High School, rushing for over 1000 yards as a senior. He originally signed with Florida State out of high school, but did not qualify academically. He spent the 2001-02 seasons at Jones Junior College, playing linebacker as a freshman before shifting to defensive end the following year. Davis was a late transfer to FSU in 2003, arriving during fall drills. He backed up Kevin Emanuel at left end, recording 18 tackles (14 solos) with two sacks, eight stops for losses, nine pressures and four pass deflections that year. In 2004, he earned the starting left end spot, responding with a team-high 21 pressures, as he also made 22 tackles with five sacks and ten stops behind the line of scrimmage. Chauncey comes from a supportive one-parent (mom) home. He is a quiet, respectful sort with good work ethic. He does need a few reps to retain plays, but will quickly utilize what he has learned (good taking it from the board to the field). Chauncey relies mostly on his quickness, as he still needs to dedicate hours in the weight room to improve his strength. He lacks the stoutness needed to hold up vs. the bigger offensive tackles and does get knocked around quite a bit at the point of attack. He is best when making plays on the move. He is not as effective a tackler when he has to pick a side than when he comes from behind or meets the ball carrier head on. When Davis is able to slant and jump around blocks, he is able to make plays vs. the run and does an effective job freeing himself up on stunts. He has good lateral agility to pursue plays down the line. On the pass rush, he is more effective when he uses his speed to beat the blocker off the snap or knife inside with his rip move. Davis needs to improve his hand usage, as he struggles to get off blocks and allows the tackles to get their hands into his chest too often. He is a decent tackler in the open, but will over-pursue when working in space. He has the flexibility to dip back and reach the edge because of his speed, but gets tied up because he fails to generate the hand extension needed to push off. If you could take the athletic ability of teammate Cedric Moore and the total effort that Chauncey shows and put it into one player, that would be a talented athlete. Unfortunately, Chauncey still has a long way to go to being a complete athlete, if ever. COMPARES TO: RAYLEE JOHNSON-Denver.
D.J. Boyer of Draft.com
Strength: Pursuing the play. Weakness: Technique
Stat Line: 10 tackles for loss and 5 sacks in 2004.
Pass rush: Non-stop pass rush motor, is at his best when a play breaks down and flushes a quarterback out of the pocket. Takes good open field angles and picks the right time knowing when to lunge or dive when pursuing the ball. Run support: Liability in run support because he is always moving upfield and getting after the quarterback. Speed/Tackling: Has great speed off the line, much better than the lackluster combine numbers he threw up.
Analysis: Chauncey Davis is a player that will get a look in the late rounds as a developmental prospect because of his quickness off the ball and pursuit ability. Davis is a liability when defending against the run and could be brought aboard as a pass rushing linebacker for a team. Davis will have to fight the stigma of the Florida State lineman who have failed before him in recent years. Davis and Eric Moore may see their draft stock slip a bit because teams know prospects from this school at defensive end have a high bust rate
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Has a motor that never stops...Can be a terror rushing the passer...Very good quickness and is a decent athlete...Profiles as an excellent special teams player.
Weaknesses: Undersized and will need to bulk up and get stronger for the next level...Doesn't have the top speed you look for and doesn't move real well...Can get dominated by massive offensive lineman...Technique is lacking.
Notes: Doesn't have all the physical tools you look for but his ability to put pressure on the quarterback will get him a shot...Probably a situational pass rusher and special teamer at best in the NFL
Scott Porter of Draft Crazy
Positives: He is an instinctive player with good pass rush moves. Is quick off the line. Plays the run well and has a great motor. Gives 100%. Very good upside as a pass rusher.
Negatives: Athletic ability is a bit of a concern. Does not have impressive size. Needs to get stronger and be more physical. Can be attacked at the line.
Bottom Line: Chauncey has a lot of talent and upside, but will fall because of his measurables. Look for him to go in the late rounds. Could be a steal if he gets stronger.

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Michael Boley

property of Southern Miss.com

Height: 6'3"
Weight: 236
School: Southern Miss
40 Time: 4.55

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Explosive linebacker with the ability to make plays in any direction on the field. Breaks down well, fluid scraping laterally and displays outstanding range. Gets depth on pass drops, quickly changes direction and displays a burst of speed to the action. Diagnoses plays, locates the ball and fills the correct gaps in run defense. Squares into tackles and wraps up. Fast to the sidelines and forceful off the edge on the blitz.
NEGATIVES: Undersized and engulfed at the point by blocks or easily knocked off balance. Not very efficient and takes too many missteps.
ANALYSIS: A solid athlete who must improve his playing strength, Boley has potential at a number of linebacker positions. Best suited on the weak side though he can also be used on the outside in the 34 defense. Has starting potential at the next level and should quickly fit in as a nickel linebacker in passing situations.
PROJECTION: Late Second Round
NFL.com Analysis
Boley has a lanky frame and needs to put on additional bulk. He is a very athletic linebacker, but is sorely lacking in playing strength. While his statistics speak for his production, it is because of his explosion and outstanding quickness roaming the field to make the play. He does a very good job of squeezing through tight quarters and shows urgency in his backside pursuit. Boley has only marginal instincts and reaction ability in pass coverage. He is better suited to make plays on the move, as he will get engulfed trying to take on blocks at the line of scrimmage. He makes passive arm swipes at the point of attack and is not the type to make plays going downhill. Based on his frame, lack of strength and inability to shed blockers, it is apparent that he will not play strongside linebacker in the pros. Having him come up in run force is sort of like leaving a box of doughnuts in a police station -- he quickly gets devoured. Boley offers decent value as a special teams player, but unless he can rectify his marginal pass defense skills, he will probably struggle in a move to the secondary. He has the range to make plays in long pursuit and can locate the ball in backside pursuit. Boley has the linear speed to close on the ball and does a good job of maintaining contact with tight ends and backs in the short area. But, he appears stiff in his hips and this causes him to be late when he has to turn and run with the speedy receivers. He also spends too much time eyeing the backfield to maintain a relationship with the opponent on deep throws. His fluid change-of-direction agility and burst make him a very effective edge rusher, but if a blocker gets a bead on him, he is quickly washed out of the play. Boley shows good stop-and-go action to redirect quickly and shows an excellent burst coming off the edge as a pass rusher. He is best when allowed to roam the field. He closes on the play with very good acceleration, but will get a little reckless, taking poor angles when he has to take the long route in order to avoid blocks. This is a player that will give some decent value, but he needs to greatly improve his work ethic in the weight room and must find a patient secondary coach to teach him the proper techniques of playing the ball in passing situations if he is to move to safety at the next level. With his slight frame, he would only bring value in certain situations (pass rush) as a linebacker and can't be considered an every-down player at that position. He is certainly a work in progress, but his speed, production and athletic ability makes him worth a look on the second day of the draft. If he can adapt to playing safety in the pros, someone will get a productive player, but it's unlikely he will ever add the bulk or gain the strength needed to be a pro linebacker.
Rob Rang of NFL Draft Scout
Michael was a standout linebacker, wide receiver and running back at Elkmont (Ala.) High School. He was a Class 3A All-State pick as a senior, recording 104 tackles with five interceptions and gaining 1015 yards rushing and 746 yards receiving that year. He redshirted in 2000 at Southern Mississippi and saw action in nine games on special teams as a reserve outside linebacker in 2001, making five tackles. He took over strong-side linebacker chores in 2002, posting 142 tackles (89 solos) with eight sacks, 16 stops for losses, two fumble recoveries, six pass deflections and a 54-yard interception return for a touchdown. Boley earned All-Conference USA first-team and College Football News All-American second-team honors as a junior. Michael registered 151 tackles (101 solos) with eleven sacks and ranked seventh in the nation with 22.5 stops behind the line of scrimmage in 2003. In 2004, Michael was a consensus All-American and named Conference USA Defensive Player of the Year. He totaled 125 tackles (70 solos) with nine sacks, 20 stops for losses, five forced fumbles and a pair of interceptions, including an incredible 62-yard touchdown return vs. North Texas in the New Orleans Bowl that ESPN called one of the best plays of the college football season. Michael has a lanky frame that desperately cries for additional bulk, but more importantly, is sorely lacking any playing strength. While his statistics speak for his production (even though they were padded), he lacks instincts and reaction ability, especially in pass coverage. He needs to make plays on the move, as he will get engulfed trying to take on blocks at the line of scrimmage. He makes passive arm swipes at the point of attack and is not the type to make plays going down hill. Based on his frame, lack of strength and inability to shed blockers, it is apparent that he will not play strong-side linebacker in the pros. He offers decent value as a special teams player, but unless he can rectify his marginal pass defense skills, he will probably struggle in a move to the secondary. He has the range to make plays in long pursuit and can locate the ball in back side pursuit. Boley has the linear speed to close on the ball and does a decent job of maintaining contact with tight ends and backs in the short area. He has fluid hips and the turn and run ability to run with the speedy receivers, but spends too much time eyeing the backfield to maintain a relationship with the opponent on deep throws. His fluid change of direction agility and burst makes him a very effective edge rusher, but if a blocker gets a bead on him, he is quickly washed out of the play. This is a kid that I feel will give some decent value, but he needs to greatly improve his work ethic in the weight room and must find a patient secondary coach to teach him the proper techniques of playing the ball in passing situations. He is certainly a work in progress, but his speed and athletic ability makes him worth a look in the later stages of the draft. COMPARES TO: MICHAEL BOULWARE-Seattle (lacks the strength that Boulware possesses, but he has good range and his frame and lack of strength make safety his best bet to play in the NFL).
Drew Boylhart of The Huddle Report
Strengths: Michael has good athletic ability and size for his position. He is very good at defending in the passing game and does a good job blitzing the QB. He has an excellent burst to the ball and is a sure tackler. In the scheme that his college team uses, Michael is used on one play right up at the line and on the very next play he will be covering a slot WR or spying on the RB or QB. Sometimes I think they use him to drive the ambulance and tape up the injured players. They have him all over the place doing just about anything they can think of.
Needs to Improve: Because Michael is used all over the place, he really hasn't been able to grow at any one position. It also gives him hesitation in making decisions, which makes it look like Michael is not that good. This is not true. He has excellent potential.
Bottom Line: Michael will be a better pro player than he was a college player, although he had a pretty good college career. I feel that he is a true WLB that can impact at the next level if you just let him grow in one position. He is not an impact tackler, but he is a good tackler and his blitzing skills and pass defending skills will be best used at this position. There is talk from the scouts that some of them think he will have to be moved to SS. That might not be a bad idea, but I think with his long arms that he will be better served at the WLB position. I really do feel that Michael will be a core player for the team that drafts him, but it will take time for him to get the skills for just one position. Michael has a lot of hidden talent. If you draft him, you will just have to be patient. If you are, he will impact.
Joseph Coaty of Tha Pack
Michael Boley was a super-productive college linebacker who has a chance to develop into a solid weak side linebacker in the NFL. Boley saw his first significant playing time on the defensive side of the ball during the 2002 season and finished the year with 142 tackles, 16 tackles for loss and 8 sacks. Over his junior and senior seasons, Boley compiled an impressive 276 tackles, 42.5 tackles for loss and 20 sacks. Boley shows great range on the football field, but he lacks ideal size and plays small for his size. If a blocker can get his hands on him, Boley generally becomes a non-factor in the play. At times, Boley looks more like a big safety rather than a small linebacker. Considering this, it's likely that Boley will be limited to playing on the weak side of the defense once he reaches the NFL, and I wouldn't rule out the possibility that he could make the move to safety. In summary, Boley will represent solid value to teams that like to play with a small but fast defense
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Very productive...Excellent speed...A playmaker who is always around the action...Good pass rusher...Very aggressive versus the run.
Weaknesses: Undersized and needs to add some bulk...Must hit the weights and get stronger...Struggles when forced to take on blocks...Only average in pass coverage.
Notes: Was overshadowed by Rod Davis for most of his career but really came into his own as a senior...Has some tools and was a great college player, but will be limited in terms of what he can do at the pro level.
Brian Maafi of Draft Crazy
Positives: Extremely talented linebacker. Quick and athletic. Has been a three year starter. Very good tackler. Pretty good hitter. Has good pass coverage skills for a college linebacker. Uses his hands well to get off blockers. Has good blitzing skills, and times blitzes well. Three down linebacker.
Negatives: On the small side, not big enough to play 'Mike' or 'Sam' 'backer at the NFL level. Has never played 'Will'. Has had a couple injuries. Not the biggest or best hitter.
Bottom Line: Boley is one of the top linebackers in the nation; Derrick Johnson is the only linebacker with more talent. Boley has great athleticism, which fits best at weakside linebacker in the NFL. Besides the fact that he needs to add some weight and learn to anchor against the run a little better, there are no other real negatives with him. He should be a starter from day one. He has the potential to be an All-Pro player. Look for Boley to go in the middle of round one.
Greg Benjamin of On The Clock Draft
Michael Boley finished off a great career in outstanding fashion posting eight tackles, two sacks and an interception that he took 62 yards for a touchdown, in a 31-10 victory over North Texas in the New Orleans bowl. Michael is a player with a great deal of experience and a great deal of speed at the linebacker positon, allowing him to make plays sideline to sideline. One problem many linebacker prospects face is their pass coverage ablity. This is not a problem for Michael who excels when asked to drop back into coverage. His biggest problem is going to be his size. He needs to add more size and strength to be able to better take on opposing offensive linemen. Depending on who drafts him, Boley could be a candidate to move to strong safety in the NFL, much like former Florida State linebacker Michael Boulware did this past season. If he can add some size he could develop into a good weak side linebacker in the NFL. Michael is also an outstanding special teams player, which is always a plus for a player entering the draft.
Dan Pompei of The Sporting News
Athletic defender with good size. Works best in the open field. Has instant speed. Plays with burst. Is a powerful tackler, but doesn't take on blocks. Has good potential in coverage. Shows awareness.

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Frank Omiyale

property of TTU Sports.com

Height: 6'4"
Weight: 310
School: Tennessee Tech
40 Time: 5.29

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Hard-working lineman with a good degree of athleticism. Blocks with forward lean, keeps his feet moving throughout the action and strong at the point of attack. Anchors in pass protection, gets his hands into opponents then controls them once engaged in a block. Quick into run blocks and does a solid job with angles and body positioning.
NEGATIVES: Lacks top footwork, blocking range and best in a small area. Stiff in his upper body and does not drive opponents off the line.
ANALYSIS: A prospect with both size and growth potential, Omiyale has significantly improved the past two seasons. Needs a lot of work and must improve the details of his game, yet possesses good upside with the ability to be used at several spots on the offensive line.
PROJECTION: Mid Fifth Round
NFL.com Analysis
Positives: Has broad shoulders and long arms ... Shows enough quickness to play in space and get out in front on traps and pulls ... Has a very quick and sudden burst off the line of scrimmage and gets into the defensive end's chest almost immediately ... Can move defenders out of the way when pulling, showing much better pop on the move than at the line of scrimmage ... Has the foot balance and athletic agility to sustain blocks ... Because of a lack of strength, he is more of a finesse, position blocker who works to get in the way of a defender ... Can short and long pull with very good accuracy ... Active with his hands, but is more of a catcher than puncher ... Light on his feet and does a good job of redirecting and kick sliding in pass protection ... Alert player who can make adjustments to games and twists ... Has good acceleration building to the second level and rarely takes false steps in his pass set.
Negatives: Shows marginal upper-body thickness and muscle development, lean arms and thin legs ... Has marginal strength and power ... Uses his hands well, but they lack strength and explosion ... Needs to add additional bulk to his lean frame ... Tight and stiff-hipped player who is high cut and this prevents him from playing at a low pad level ... Will get good arm extension, but lacks the strength to punch and will lose hand placement as a result ... Struggles to anchor and is slow to the point of attack, but plays better on the move ... Even though he gets to the second level quickly, he will fall off blocks working in space.
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Has good size and the frame to add weight and get bigger...Has long arms...Has a nasty demeanor on the field...Good athlete who moves well...Has a lot of upside.
Weaknesses: Level of competition is a concern...Needs to bulk up...Very raw in terms of technique and will require a lot of coaching...Not very instinctive...Must get stronger.
Notes: Small school sleeper who has the physical tools pro scouts look for...Interesting developmental prospect who might be worth taking a flyer on at some point on day two.

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DeAndra Cobb

property of Spartans Online

Height: 5'10"
Weight: 196
School: Michigan State
40 Time: 4.49

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Game-breaking running back with home-run-hitting speed. Plays much faster than his 40 time, can immediately switch it on and possesses good first step quickness. Displays the ability to immediately get through a small amount of open field then beats defenders in a foot race. Keeps his feet moving up the field, works runs and drives to pick up as much yardage as possible.
NEGATIVES: Lacks top running vision and the ability to quickly cut back against the grain. Must improve his route running as a receiver out of the backfield.
ANALYSIS: A straight-ahead runner who improved his skill as the season progressed last year, Cobb is an explosive skill player for the next level. Does not have the size to be an every-down ballcarrier, yet if he improves his pass-catching skills he will be given a look as a third-down back. Solid developmental prospect worth the investment of a late-round choice.
PROJECTION: Mid Seventh Round
NFL.com Analysis
Positives: Has a small, but compact frame with lean muscle tone, high cut, good bubble and some thickness in his thighs and calves ... Shows above-average balance, agility and quickness ... Sudden in his burst off the snap and can get to top speed instantly ... Runs tough and competes very well for additional yardage, lowering his shoulders and driving with his legs to drive the defender off the ball ... Shows adequate instincts, awareness and run vision, doing a nice job of following his blocks as a kickoff returner ... Has the balance and explosion to gain advantage shooting the rush lanes. ... Not the type that will move the pile, but will lower his pads and protect himself and the ball ... Is quick to plant and drive, and has the shake and spinning moves to elude in the open ... Can reach the corner and change an angle, showing quick lateral moves while displaying that second gear needed to win the footrace along the perimeter.
Negatives: While he shows patience with his blockers on kickoff returns, he can be a little too quick and aggressive as a running back, causing him to outrun his protection ... Since he lacks running strength, he will go down too easily ... Shows decent receiving ability, but he lacks natural hands and needs to do a better job extending for the ball ... As a returner, he can be inconsistent to find the lanes, but is tough and will run aggressively ... More useful as a change-of-pace back, as he does not have the size to withstand every down punishment ... A lack of receiving skills will prevent him from seeing much action in passing situations ... Can separate on his routes, but needs to do a better job of adjusting through the patterns (takes soft angle cuts).

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Darrell Shropshire

property of the USC Sports.com

Height: 6'2"
Weight: 301
School: South Carolina
40 Time: 4.87

Sports Illustrated by TFY Draft Preview
POSITIVES: Hard-working interior lineman effective stuffing the run. Quick off the snap, holds his ground against blocks and displays a good change of direction pursuing to the play. Solid speed to the flanks, strings plays out to the sideline and rarely off his feet. Excellent balance and body control. Solid recognition and makes plays defending the pass as well as the run.
NEGATIVES: Gets tall and easily controlled at the point by a single blocker. Does not get much push up the field.
ANALYSIS: Possessing the body type and head to play at the next level, Shropshire has potential as a backup in a conventional defense and will also get consideration at nose tackle.
PROJECTION: Late Fourth Round
NFL.com Analysis
Positives: Has a wide body with good chest thickness, muscular arms, big bubble, thick thighs and calves and good balance ... Disruptive player who has some quickness and power for the inside ... Coming off the snap, he shows good quickness to shoot a gap and get penetration ... Demonstrates very good hand usage and does a good job of protecting his legs vs. low blocks ... Plays on his feet and will run to the ball with a sudden burst ... Has very good strength at the point of attack ... Works the gaps well and gets a quick push heading upfield ... Can be a disruptive force and push the pocket ... Has adequate instincts to find the ball and wins most battles against guards and center with his quick explosion when working inside ... Brings force behind his tackles and has the foot speed to pursue from the back side.
Negatives: Has a good burst off the snap, but poor hand usage, which causes him to struggle in attempts to get off blocks ... As a pass rusher, he is not very productive, as he lacks good rip, swim and club moves ... His pad level is poor at times and he needs to be more stout against the double team ... Needs to play lower in his pads, especially when attempting to hold ground at the point of attack ... Does not have the long speed to pursue from the back side.
Scott Wright of NFL Draft Countdown
Strengths: Has good size...Has excellent strength...Is very durable...Good quickness...Does an excellent job of stuffing the middle...A force against the run.
Weaknesses: Is not a great pass rusher and doesn't have many moves...Is not a great athlete or very fast...Won't chase anyone down...Does not move well.
Notes: Isn't a dynamic playmaker but he does his job and opens things up for others...Has the type of skills that lead you to believe he could be a good nose tackle in the pros.

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