2002 DRAFT RECAP

This is the greatest collection of information on each Falcon draft pick that you can find on the internet. It is a collection from multiple on-line sources about each player, so that you know how each of the experts feel on each player.


Falcons 2002 Draft Picks:

Round Pick Overall Pos. Player School
1 18 18 RB T.J. Duckett Michigan State
3 15 80 DE Will Overstreet Tennessee
4 18 116 DE Martin Bibla Miami (Fla.)
5 13 148 S Kevin McCadam Virginia Tech
5 23 158 QB Kurt Kittner Illinois
6 12 184 WR Kahlil Hill Iowa
7 6 217 WR Mike Coleman Widener
7 34 145 T Kevin Shaffer Tulsa


 

RB #8 - T.J. Duckett

Height: 6' Weight: 254 40 Time: 4.45
College: Michigan State

By PFW at NFL Draft 2002
Notes: Unanimous high school All-American. Parade High School Player of the Year and was among the top five names on almost every national recruiter's list. Played linebacker and quarterback in high school and was a great power-running quarterback and the best linebacker in the nation. Also put the high school shot (which is lighter) 64 feet, 7 inches and ran on the school's sprint-relay team, clocking under 11.0 in the 100 meters. Was recruited as a linebacker first and running back second, and he wanted to play defense. Began 1998 as the team's backup middle linebacker and short-yardage runner. Ended the year on offense, where he rushed for 159 yards and four scores against a Penn State defense that featured Courtney Brown and LaVar Arrington. Despite only seeing limited offensive action early in the year and not starting a game, Duckett still carried 118 times for 606 yards and 10 touchdowns and caught two passes for 32 yards. Rushed for 810 yards in Michigan State's first five games in 2000 before groin, shoulder, hip and ankle injuries hampered his play and caused him to miss almost one entire game and parts of many others. Still finished the year with 240-1,353-7 and caught 8-39 yards. Carried 236-1,236-10 and caught 12-88-1 in '01. Positives: Terrific athlete with tremendous size, speed and strength. Has a massive lower body and great leg drive and strength. Can break tackles and really punish defenders when he wants to. Has very good speed for a big back. At times shows he can be sudden and hit the hole quickly. He can bounce outside and has some make-you-miss ability. Duckett has improved his hands and pass-catching skills. He can dominate good teams, as he showed against Michigan and Fresno State. Potentially, he can get much better with experience at running back. Negatives: Only player in his group who was not injured and did not run at the Combine. Had a very hot-and-cold season in '01 and, at one point, the coaches pulled him from the game. Is slow to get going and runs too much like Ron Dayne at times, taking too long to hit and attack the hole. Does not always work to finish his runs. Limited experience at running back shows up at times, when it comes to making run decisions and using his blockers. Is still far from an accomplished pass catcher and is not a good or overly eager blocker. Seems to lose focus and gets sloppy with the ball at times. Summary: Can be almost as good as he wants to be with more experience - if he will really pay the price. But after last season, that is a big "if".
By Rob Rang of Boomer's NFL Draft
Powerful, deceptively quick runner that possibly projects even better to the NFL than he did to college. Has developed from a freakish goal line option as a freshman (10 TDs) to being one of the more dominating running forces in the land the last two seasons. Rushed for 1,353 yards a sophomore (5.6 YPC), and backed that up with 1,420 yards this year (5.4 YPC). An absolute load out of the backfield. Squares his shoulders into the defender and looks for contact. Has the quickness that every big back entering the NFL since Jerome Bettis has failed to have. Forget the comparisons to Ron Dayne. Dayne is powerful, but is a plodder running the football. Duckett is no William Green type breakaway threat, but he can pick up yardage in chunks, and is more elusive than one would think when in the open field. He has broken run of at least 55 yards each season for the Spartans, and his career long is 68 yards... Good vision, and surprisingly efficient cut back ability. Duckett is a decisive runner, and when he sees a hole, he breaks through it with great force. He has developed into a fairly reliable receiver, as his increase in receptions each season (2 in 1999, 8, 12) proves. In fact, one a team with superstar receiver Charles Rogers, it was Duckett who had the team's most important catch - snaring the game winning touchdown against #6 rated Michigan with no time remaining... Duckett is also a fairly decent blocker. He positions himself well, has his head on a swivel, and blocks with decent fundamentals. He could be a bit more tenacious in his blocking, however... Legitimate 1st round back with Pro Bowls potentially in his future...
By NFL War Room at The Sporting News
Overall: 8.3 NFL Comparison: Ron Dayne, Giants Strengths: Is a big, physical player with outstanding size, decent speed and good measurable skills. Has good athletic ability for a big back. Has decent change-of-direction skills. Shows good initial quickness, and has a surprisingly quick first step through the hole. Does not mind mixing it up between the tackles, and shows good vision and a little bit of shiftiness. Does an excellent job of carrying tacklers with him, and generates good yardage after the catch. Despite his lack of top-end speed, is a good threat in the open field and on the second level of the defense because of his size and shiftiness. Bounces some plays outside, and is a load to tackle in the open field. Is much shiftier and dangerous in the open field than most realize. Has adequate hands, and will make the easy catches on dump-offs and screens. Has shown the ability to stay healthy and play through pain even though running style creates a lot of collisions. >b>Weaknesses: Does not have great speed to the corner, and is not much of a perimeter runner. Needs to develop a little more patience as an inside runner; has a tendency to run a little high and hit the hole before the play has developed. Is not a natural receiver, and will struggle running complicated routes or downfield routes. Will not make tough catches. Is not a great blocker. Is often late to the point of attack and indecisive when asked to block. Takes a lot of straight-on hits, and is the type of back who could wear down over a 16-game season. Bottom line: Duckett frequently is compared to guys like the Giants' Ron Dayne and the Steelers' Jerome Bettis, but he has better quickness and explosion than Dayne and is more versatile than Bettis. Duckett, however, is not as consistent or patient as Bettis. Duckett is a punishing back with outstanding size. He has better change-of-direction skills and speed than you would think for a man his size, but he can't create on his own and still needs a lot of work in the passing game as a receiver and blocker. Durability obviously is a concern -- he has had problems with his groin, ankle, knees, shoulder and hip -- for a runner with Duckett's style. If he can stay healthy, Duckett could be a premier back in the NFL.
By Brian DeLucia of FoxSports
Duckett is an enormous back who shows good movement skills for his size. He shows above average quickness and has good vision near the line of scrimmage. He also has good feet to make adjustments near the hole. With good strength and balance, Duckett will gain a lot of yardage after contact and break some runs in the second level. He doesn't show natural perimeter quickness, but is tough to bring down in the open field. He can snatch the ball in the passing game on simple routes. He is willing in pass protection, but needs to be more consistent with his hands as a blocker. The one concern with Duckett is that he's taken a pounding over the last two years as a starter. Duckett will be a consistent ball-control back who will also break a few long runs. He's more skillful than Ron Dayne, but lacks the attacking nature of Jerome Bettis.
By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: Big-bodied runner that started his career as a middle linebacker but quickly became the team's feature back as a true freshman and has been productive the past three seasons. Rushed for 236/1,236/5.2/10 as a junior, also catching 12/80/6.7/1. Totaled 240/1,353/5.6/7 on the ground as a sophomore and caught 8/39/4.9, though he missed time due to assorted groin, shoulder and ankle injuries. Did not start a single game as a true freshman but rushed for 118/606/5.1/10. Totaled seven games last year in which he rushed for more than 100 yards and has topped the 200-yard mark on three different occasions during his career. THE GOOD: Powerful back that is more than just a road-grader. Sees the field, finds the open spot in the defense, displaying good footwork and the ability to side-step opponents. Quick through the hole, has a burst in the open field and puts his shoulders down when tackled. Patient, will pick and choose his spots and follows his blocks. Rarely brought down by the first opponent or a single defender and picks up a lot of yardage off initial contact. THE BAD: Does not lumber or plod as you'd imagine a big back would and shows the ability to squeeze through small openings. Good receiver out of the backfield and a reliable target in the short field. Does not always seem to run with a physical style or really look like he is playing to his size. THE SKINNY: Needs to condition himself and attack the game but should easily be able to take the pounding of an every down back at the next level. Mid First Round.
By Dave Te Thomas at CBS SportsLine
ANALYSIS Positives: Dangerous open field runner with a muscular upper body and strong legsÖ Has good inside leg drive with stutterstep moves and lateral agility to break it open turning the cornerÖ Durable workhorse with sturdy legs and exceptional upper body powerÖ Reads the holes well and has the balance to power his way up the middleÖHas quick feet and superb head & shoulder fakesÖShows loose hips dipping to the outsideÖConstantly driving forward with his legs to gain extra yardage after initial contactÖMakes sharp lateral cuts and has that extra gear to vary his speed through the holesÖStrong tackle breaker with the strength to punish opponents on the perimeter. Negatives: Not an effective pass catcher, tending to let the ball absorb into his body rather than extendÖLacks the sustained speed to elude at the second levelÖDespite his frame, he only makes passive attempts to face up to defenders in pass blockingÖTakes too many unnecessary hits running up the middle, as he tends to get a little too upright in his stance (needs to run at a lower pad level)ÖHas to show better ball security, as he does not always protect the ball away from the defenders. CAREER NOTES Nicknamed the "Diesel," number 8 (in honor of his brother Tico, who wore number 35, 3+5=8) has drawn comparisons to the Pittsburgh Steelers' "Bus," Jerome Bettis, for their hard-driving running styleÖThe three-year sensation opted to test the pro waters rather than return for his senior season, but he left MSU with 621 carries for 3379 yards (5.4 avg) and 29 touchdownsÖHis 621 attempts rank sixth on the Spartans' career-record chart while his 3379 yards are topped only by Sedrick Irvin (3504, 1996-98), Blake Ezor (3749, 1986-89), Tico Duckett (4212, 1989-92) and Lorenzo White (4887, 1984-87)ÖHis 5.4-yard average places him ninth in school annalsÖOnly Ezor (34), Irvin (35) and White (43) scored more touchdowns on the ground at MSU than his 29ÖAlso had 22 receptions for 151 yards (6.9 avg) and a score. REMINDS YOU OF... Jerome Bettis, Pittsburgh Steelers. Few big men have the explosive leg drive, lateral agility and quickness that Duckett possesses. GAZING INTO THE CRYSTAL BALL... If not for more pressing needs elsewhere, Duckett would have been the primary target for the Detroit Lions. He is the complete back who will probably not be around after Cleveland picks in the first round.
By D.J. Boyer of Football.com
Strengths: Size, Quick first step Weaknesses: Receiving, Patience Assessment: Duckett is in a battle with William Green and DeShaun Foster to be the first running back taken in the draft. Duckett is a different type of back than the other two listed and his size has a lot to do with that. Duckett however is faster than Ron Dayne, the player many are comparing Duckett to. Duckett has a very quick first step and can cause a lot of mismatches in the secondary because of his large size. Isn't the fastest back but runs very smooth and has good speed for his girth. Duckett needs to learn patience, he doesn't wait for the holes to open up on his offensive line at times. Duckett is a decent blocker and has very good footwork for a runner his size but he needs to becoming a better receiver at the next level. Michigan State made a conscious effort to get him more receptions at the end of the season but he looked uncomfortable and lost running his routes. Has a shot at being a late first round pick or he could go early in the second round.
By STATS, Inc. at FoxSports
Duckett is the big physical back of this year's draft. He is built in the same mold as Jerome Bettis and Ron Dayne. He has good size (6-1 253) and is a punishing runner. He likes to run in between the tackles and shows a burst through the line. Duckett is an upright runner, taking quite a few hits straight on. Once he gets matched up on linebackers, he does have some elusiveness and can make them miss. In the secondary, there are few defensive backs that want to take him head on.He doesn't have the speed to constantly get to the outside. With his size, Duckett should be an asset in blocking, but he needs a lot of work in this area. He does a very bad job of recognizing blitzes and who to pick up. When he does block, he generally does a good job. However, he still has a lot to learn as he will be taking on bigger defenders in the NFL than he did at Michigan State. His hands are average at best, and he is not much of a threat out of the backfield. The main reason for this is he was not used in the passing game. When he does catch the ball, he doesn't look comfortable. Duckett may have room to improve in this area but as of right now will probably be taken out on third down. He was banged up in 2000 but stayed healthy this past year.He is not a consistent performer, as he has games where he disappears at times. He also does not seem to play with much emotion. For someone who was a former linebacker and loves contact, he doesn't posses the fiery attitude those types of players tend to have.
By Aaron Freeman of FalcFans.com
I have some concerns about Duckett, although the upside is definitely there. Duckett was a powerful running quarterback coming out of high school. His abilities as a runner were so great that Michigan State started him almost immediately at running back. Duckett is very powerful, and everyone wants to compare him to Jerome Bettis. And that comparison is definitely warranted, but I'm afraid Duckett is closer to Ron Dayne than Bettis. Dayne was a magnificent college runner, like Duckett, but has yet to prove he was worth the 11th overall selection in 2000 and has yet to prove he is a feature back. Duckett has plenty of upside considering that he's still learning the running back position. He is fast for his size, but probably not as fast as his timed speed. He can be explosive and powerful with good vision on some downs, but then just average on the next. He was too inconsistent a college runner. Duckett has far greater upside than Dayne, but if he is not a feature back, then he won't be worth a first round selection. I think Duckett will be better than Dayne, but how much better is up to him.
Click here to view Duckett's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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DE #90 - Will Overstreet

Height: 6'27/8" Weight: 259 40 Time: 4.65
College: Tennessee

By PFW at NFL Draft2002
Notes: Former high school All-American who also lettered in basketball and track. Lived up to expectations by playing enough to letter as a freshman and then starting and becoming a quality all-type player the past three years. Had 14 stops, two sacks and one other tackle for loss in 1998. Had 54 tackles, seven tackles for loss and 7 1/2 sacks in '99 and 43-6-4 1/2 and one interception in 2000, despite being hampered by injuries. Missed spring practice in '00 because of a back problem and then hurt his knee four games into the season and was never full speed after that. Had his knee scoped after the season. Came back to register 35-9-5 in '01, when he missed two games and three starts as a result of a sprained left medial collateral ligament and partial tear suffered Sept. 29. Overstreet was an Academic All-Conference player the past three years and also won first-team All-Southeastern Conference honors from the league coaches and second-team honors from The Associated Press last season. Positives: High-motor, intense player who plays hard, plays hurt and has all the intangibles. Overstreet is a technically sound player who generally plays with leverage, uses his hands well and keeps his pads low. He can get upfield to rush the passer, chase running plays to the sideline, slide through small areas in the line and generally hold his own vs. the run as long as he is playing with good pad level and not being engulfed by a huge tackle who has latched on to him. He also will drop into coverage or latch on to the tight end in certain defensive schemes. He is a good athlete for a down end and has exceptional timed speed. Has good size and rushing skills for a linebacker and can play over and control a tight end. Overstreet also looked as though he could be an excellent special-teams player at the Senior Bowl. Negatives: Tweener who has marginal size for an end and needs to be on the edge or in a gap and not head-up on a 300-plus-pound tackle. He is a little stiff as a linebacker, and it is still hard to say if his movement in reverse and going laterally will be what scouts want. Durability is a major concern because he has a history of back problems and has missed a lot of time because of his back and two knee injuries. Summary: A tweener with medical concerns but also a very good football player with lots of heart. Really helped himself with his work on special teams at the Senior Bowl.
By NFL War Room at The Sporting News
Overall: 6.0 Strengths: Is one of the most active players in his class. Has a good first step. Never stops hustling. Has adequate speed; rarely gets beat to the corner. Shows good moves in pursuit. Has exceptional instincts and first move. Gets off the ball with great power and stays level out of his stance. Does a nice job using hands to avoid getting caught in traffic. Is technically sound -- will keep pads low, and plays with leverage. Is an explosive tackler who has learned to strip quarterbacks from the backside. Weaknesses: Is a inability against the run. Lacks the size and lower-body strength to stack and shed blockers at the point of attack. Always is trying to run around, not through, blockers. Needs to add lower-body strength to be an every-down player. Has average speed for a pass-rush specialist. Is not as explosive as some of the top edge rushers. Bottom line: Overstreet might be one of the more overrated players in this class. Scouts love his tenaciousness, hustle, intelligence and technique, but he is undersized at the point of attack and doesn't have explosive speed. He makes a lot of plays because he never quits, has great body control and his college system puts him in position to rush from the weakside. In terms of NFL potential, Overstreet is limited.
By Brian DeLucia of FoxSports
Tennessee's Will Overstreet doesn't get enough respect, but he's a football player. He is just ordinary size and doesn't look like a great athlete, but he displays deceptive feet and quickness on the field. He shows good initial quickness off the ball and good feet, while also showing surprising closing quickness on the quarterback. Against the run, he's not an in-line player at his size, but he locates the ball quickly and does a good job in pursuit. He's not the natural blue-chip talent that franchises look to build around at defensive end, but he can put up respectable numbers due to his intensity and relentless motor on the field. Long-term durability is one concern with Overstreet, as he's been nagged by a few injuries, especially with his knees.
By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: All-Conference selection as a senior after totaling 36/11.5/1.5. Numbers as a junior were 40/6/4.5, after 51/6/7.5 his sophomore campaign when he broke into the starting line-up. Awarded All-Academic honors on several occasions the past three seasons and also saw extensive action as a true freshman. THE GOOD: Relentless, high revving lineman that plays through the whistle. Quick off the snap with a nice first step, plays with solid fundamentals and techniques, doing anything necessary to get to the ball carrier to make the tackle. Displays terrific football intelligence; reads and diagnoses the play, defends the run and disciplined even against option teams. Effective using his hands to stay off blocks, displays the ability to string the action out laterally and has a closing burst of speed. Also somewhat effective if dropped off the line of scrimmage into pass coverage on zone blitzes. THE BAD: Not big or bulky, slow adjusting off the initial block and easily knocked out of his angle of attack. Engulfed by bigger opponents and though he's improved his ability to defend the run, still has difficulties if opponents direct the action straight towards him. THE SKINNY: May not have the great size but a solid and smart football player that will be an asset on the field or in the locker-room. Mid Second Round.
By Dave Te Thomas at CBS SportsLine
ANALYSIS Positives: Tough play-maker who possesses a good combination of strength and speedÖ Thrives on rushing the passerÖAggressive run stuffer who has solid upper body power, quick feet and fluid redirection skillsÖWorks hard to get off blocks and has dynamic rush movesÖDecisive in his charge, extending his arms properly to engulf the quarterbackÖ Maintains balance working through traffic, using his hands with force to avoid low blocksÖVery effective in his backside pursuit, using his long arms to flush the quarter-back out while attacking the ballÖHas a relentless motor. Negatives: His lack of size prevents him from being a consistent force vs. the runÖHas had a series of injuries that makes one question his durabilityÖLacks the lower leg drive to be effective vs. the larger blockersÖDoes not utilize his speed as well as he should, lacking that explosion coming off the snapÖStrictly an edge rusher who is limited to weakside duties. CAREER NOTES Highly decorated, both on the football field and in the class roomÖThree-time Academic All-Southeastern Conference pick who was slowed by knee problems in his senior yearÖ A relentless tackler, he totaled 146 tackles (103 solos) with 19 quarterback sacks and 37 stops behind the line of scrimmage during his career with the VolunteersÖHis 19 sacks rank eighth on the school's career-record list. REMINDS YOU OF... Mike Vrabel, New England Patriots. I love his heart, I love his drive, but feel he may be better suited to play linebacker in a 3-4 system. GAZING INTO THE CRYSTAL BALL... Gets devoured too much by the bigger blockers to be an every down player. He spends more time in the training room than the equipment manager, yet his heart is tremendous. Move him to linebacker and he'll be a great one.
By D.J. Boyer of Football.com
Strengths: Hustle, Tackling Weaknesses: Lower body strength, Shedding blockers Assessment: Tennessee always produces its share of great lineman on the offensive and defensive side of the football. Overstreet is a safe pick for a defensive end but he doesn't have the upside that the others ahead of him have. Overstreet tackles good angles in pursuit and is always hustling when the ball is in play. Overstreet has good hands and is a solid tackler, moves well laterally to stop runners coming around the corner of the line. Overstreet always has his feet moving but his lower body is weak, he has to rely on his hands and his quick first step to shed would be blockers. The speed of the lineman in the NFL may get to him at first but he will adjust and be a solid prospect.
By STATS, Inc. at FoxSports
Overstreet is a hard working defensive end who is a bit undersized. He has a good first step and anticipation of the snap count. He plays at a good pad level and has excellent feel for the position. Due to his lack of size he isn't very good in the running game. He also doesn't have enough lower body strength at the moment to be an every down player. For a pass-rushing specialist, he isn't especially fast. He doesn't like contact, as he will rarely try to go through an offensive lineman; instead he will most always try and go wide. There isn't much physically to like about Overstreet, but he was always making plays. One thing to consider in that regard is the amount of attention that other teams were paying to John Henderson and Albert Haynesworth -- Overstreet saw very few double teams this year, which may further reflect on his liabilities.
By Aaron Freeman of FalcFans.com
Is a good upfield pass rusher with great explosition and speed off the line of scrimmage. Can get around the edge well. Unfortunately, can't do much else other than that. Is not strong and will be easily manhandled by most NFL linemen. Could project to an outside linebacker in the 3-4 system. Otherwise he is just a situational pass rusher that needs to bulk and get stronger. Has upside as a pass rusher, but I don't think he'll be able to keep his speed if he bulks up too much. A classic tweener candidate that is too talented as a pass rusher to not go on the first day of the draft.
Click here to view Overstreet's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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G #65 - Martin Bibla

Height: 6'3" Weight: 306 40 Time: 5.08
College: Miami (Fla.)

By PFW at NFL Draft2002
Notes: Played in every game and started four times as a second-year freshman in 1998. Started at right guard the past three years and won All-Conference and some All-America notice in 2001. Positives: Smart, tough, blue-collar type who gives 110 percent and gets the most out of his ability. Quick off the ball and into blocks and understands blocking angles and position. Can play low and with leverage in close quarters. Studies and prepares well for his opponent so he can see, sense and anticipate things. Negatives: Lacks great natural athletic ability and strength. Looks more athletic in workouts than in games. Lack of top athletic ability shows up on the second level and when he is pass blocking on the edge. Summary: Tough, hard-nosed, overachieving, blue-collar, lunch-pail type of lineman who plays up to and beyond his ability.
By Rob Rang of Boomer's NFL Draft
Doesn't play with excellent athleticism, nor have the great weight room strength, quickness, or size to stand out. Has however, been so good for so long that he tends to go unnoticed. Has played in nearly every game of his career with the Hurricanes, starting the last 36 consecutively. Has never allowed a sack. plays with excellent fundamentals. Quick off the snap, and punching the defender, or pushing him down to the ground as quickly as any interior lineman I've scouted in years. Moves his feet to mirror the defender's rush, keeping his back to the ball. Stays low in his stance, and blocks with leverage. Good lateral quickness, and is intelligent - recognizes stunts and adjusts. Considered by the Miami coaching staff to be the team's best offensive lineman, and they have Bryant McKinnie, the potential #1 pick of the draft. Vastly underrated by many who point out the talent Bibla is surrounded by in McKinnie and highly acclaimed, Joaquin Gonzalez. Bibla, however, controlled Washigton's fireplug defensive tackle, Larry Tripplett one on one, and that, in itself, speaks volumes. A high effort kid whose intelligence and fundamental play cannot be minimized. Likely drafted lower than he should, I expect Bibla to eventually be considered one of the steals of the draft.
By NFL War Room at The Sporting News
Overall: 5.5 Strengths: Is a solid but not great all-around player. Is an aggressive physical blocker. Has an outstanding motor and plays with a mean streak. Takes good angles, stays low, plays with good leverage and is very efficient in a confined area. Has good strength, will be able to outmuscle defenders at the point of attack. Will get under pads and drive his leg. Never stops working. Weaknesses: Will sometimes play too aggressive and misses some assignments as a result. Doesn't have great athleticism and really lacks an upside. Does not move very well. Has trouble when left in space or when he is asked to block on the second level. Doesn't change directions very well and will get beaten by quicker, 3-technique defensive tackles. Bottom line: Bibla was very efficient at the college level, but he was also protected very well. Very few work as hard as he does and his ability to stay low and drive his legs is impressive. He is not very athletic and he is not one of the most powerful guards, but he plays hard and he fights on every down. Because of his leverage and work ethic, Bibla very rarely gets beaten, and that's why he is worth a look in the middle of the draft.
By Brian DeLucia of FoxSports
Miami's Martin Bibla has excellent strength and toughness, but I haven't seen it translate to the field. He's a little slow off the ball and is erratic with his hands. He also doesn't use his lower body to gain leverage and power. Has good awareness and takes good angles, but his athletic limitations show up in space. He's a scrapper who will have to find a niche with the right team.
By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: Four-year starter and second team All-Conference selection last year as a senior. Totaled 36 repetitions on the bench during combine workouts. THE GOOD: Tough, hard working lineman best in confined quarters. Quick off the snap into his blocks or setting in pass protection, immediately gets his hands up and sets with a wide base. Strong at the point of attack anchoring in pass protection or turning opponents out run blocking. Plays with forward lean, stays square and a disciplined lineman that plays assignment football. THE BAD: Blocks straight legged, does not move well in space and has difficulty with quick, nimble opponents. Bends at the waist, cannot kick out or pull and effective only straight ahead. THE SKINNY: If he learns to bend his knees, play with leverage and is also put in a scheme where he is not asked to move much, he'll be effective at the next level. Mid Fifth Round.
By Dave Te Thomas at CBS SportsLine
ANALYSIS Positives: Naturally quick athlete who does an outstanding job staying with contact once he locks onÖHas an above average burst, playing with awareness while neutralizing the linebackers on sweepsÖAble to out-muscle & turn the defender at the point of attackÖCombative and intense drive blocker who is a very strong finisherÖHas the speed and power to ride defenders wideÖShows good pass protection technique, extending his arms and shuffling his feet while retreatingÖDoes a nice job of out-muscling defenders on running plays, staying low in his stance while delivering a strong hand set and punch to rock his man back. Negatives: Needs more upper body muscle refinementÖShuffles his feet quickly to adjust in pass protection, but needs to extend his arms better to prevent from delivering glancing blowsÖ Gets a little sloppy late in the games, appearing to get too upright, failing to drive defenders off the ballÖDespite his speed, is not consistent getting to the second levelÖHas to develop better arm extension to prevent defenders from getting their hands into his chestÖKeeps his leg base too narrow, causing him to lose leverageÖLacks the lateral agility to be consistent working in space, as he tends to lose his baseÖHas to work on delivering a more explosive hand punchÖHas knock-knees. CAREER NOTES Regarded by teammates and coaches as the best pure offensive lineman on Miami's outstanding offensive lineÖSet the tone in technique, attitude and work ethic for the nation's finest offensive lineÖAn outstanding guard who has been overshadowed by Miami's excellent tackles, but is just as deserving of accoladesÖDurable athlete who never missed a game due to injuriesÖStarted 40 of 46 games he's played in for the Hurricanes and never allowed a quarterback sack.
By D.J. Boyer of Football.com
Strengths: Lower body strength, Leverage Weaknesses: Blocking upfield, Body positioning Assessment: Bibla is a person who is his own worst critic. A perfectionist who lives by technique rather than sheer strength. Uses arms well and gets into the body of defensive tackles. Has a low center of gravity and amazing leverage which makes him hard to beat. Has impressive leg drive but is sometimes slow when asked to break from the line and block upfield. Can sometimes be turned around by quick moves or trying to stop a rush from another angle. Does a good job with his footwork and can block well while backpedaling. Should be a fourth or fifth round draft pick.
By STATS, Inc. at FoxSports
Bibla has been a starter for the Hurricanes since his freshman year; he started four games that year. He isn't a very big or physical guard. Instead, he uses good leverage and technique. He gets low and uses his leg strength to beat his defender. He constantly gives his all and will not be outworked. His lack of athleticism shows in his pass blocking, as he doesn't always do a good job of sliding to meet defenders. He also isn't very good at pulling or at blocking in space.
Click here to view Bibla's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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SS #5 - Kevin McCadam

Height: 6'1" Weight: 219 40 Time: N/A
College: Virgnia Tech

By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: Junior college transfer used as the team's rover, a hybrid linebacker/safety position. Posted 83/2/6 last season after 28/0/1 the prior year. THE GOOD: Solid athlete best at strong safety. Quick reading the action, displays a burst of speed and works to get involved in the play. Effectively pursues to the ball, covers the pass well in the short field and productive on special teams. THE BAD: Lacks range, does not get depth on his pass drops and only average coverage skills. Also slow shedding blocks. THE SKINNY: Tenacity, coupled with his size/speed numbers makes him perfect for special teams at the next level and has an outside shot to make it as a team's eight defensive back. Free Agent.
Click here to view McCadam's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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QB #15 - Kurt Kittner

Height: 6'2" Weight: 221 40 Time: 4.86
College: Illinois

By PFW at NFL Draft2002
Notes: Played only four games at quarterback his senior year of high school before breaking his hand. Came back as a linebacker later in the year. Started five consecutive games at Illinois as an 18-year-old true freshman, completing 72-of-162 passes for 782 yards with one touchdown and seven interceptions. Also ran for 28 yards and two scores after taking away all the yardage he lost while being sacked. Really came into his own in '99, when he completed 216-396-2,702-24-5 and capped off the season by being named the MVP of the Micronpc.com bowl, in which Illinois routed Virginia. Team's MVP in 2000, when he completed 173-297-1,982-18-8 before being knocked out for the year with a concussion suffered in Game 10 vs. Ohio State. Kittner also rushed for 61 yards and two scores after rushing for a career-high 83 yards (one TD) in '99, when he also caught a 30-yard TD pass on a trick play. In '01, Kittner won second-team All-Big Ten honors and led the Illini to the Big Ten championship, starting every game and completing 207-374-2,994-23-13. Also rushed for two scores (38 rushes for minus-4 yards). Ended the year by getting off to a horrible start vs. Louisiana State in the Sugar Bowl but bounced back to throw four TD passes and almost got his team back in the game. Positives: Well-built with a solid, thick body. Has fine leadership qualities, work habits and intangibles. Will play hurt. Poised and can handle big-game pressure. Mentally and physically tough. Can play terribly early in a game and then rally his team. Will stand in against the rush and take hits. Has been coached by Ron Turner, a former NFL offensive coordinator and now Illinois' head coach, throughout his college career - and it shows. Generally sets up well and has good throwing mechanics. Shows good but not great timing, touch and anticipation of his receiver and generally throws a nice, tight pass. Has adequate arm strength and can zip the shorter routes. Is starting to learn to play within himself and to throw the ball away when nothing is there. Has played in very bad weather against outstanding competition. Negatives: Lacks great physical tools. Has just slightly above-average athletic ability and below-average mobility and scrambling ability. Does not have a top arm, and some of his deep passes will hang. Underthrows a lot of long passes, but in some instances this may be by design, so his receiver can come back for the ball. Streaky, somewhat erratic passer who has had some ice-cold stretches. Will bird dog his primary receiver way too often. Needs to do a better job of looking off his man. Gets quite a few passes batted down. Summary: Kittner is not the thrower or talent Jeff George was, nor is he as accurate and mobile as Tony Eason was. But Kittner has the intangibles and stability George lacked and is a tougher player than Eason. He's a Jack Trudeau-type prospect but better across the board.
By Rob Rang of Boomer's NFL Draft
Streaky quarterback with the intelligence, experience, and all around ability to develop into a fine NFL quarterback. The leader of an explosive Illini offense that demands quick reads and excellent accuracy. Showed some potential as a redshirt freshman in 1998, throwing for over 780 yards in mop-up duty. Broke out as a sophomore to throw for over 2,700 yards and an excellent 24-5 TD to INT ratio. The numbers went slightly down in 2000, however, as his favorite target, receiver Brandon Lloyd, went down with a broken leg in the spring. The injury was somewhat a blessing in disguise - at least for Kittner's pro development - as he was forced to now look off defenders and began to better utilize the other weapons around him. Threw for a very respectable 18-8 ratio, but the passing yards dropped greatly (1,982). This year, however, with the explosive Lloyd back on the field, Kittner enjoyed a great final campaign (23-13, 2,994 yards) led Illinois to the Sugar Bowl and their best season in decades. A classic drop back passer that sets up nicely in the pocket and has learned to scan the field. He has a sneaky velocity on his passes, and is above average overall in his accuracy. He can throw the ball with excellent touch, and can make every NFL throw. A notoriously slow starter, though once he gets warmed up in a game, he is as accurate as they come... Senses pressure well, but is not very nimble in the pocket. Struggled mightily at the Senior Bowl, but you just have to like this kid's cool consistency throughout his career, posting great numbers even when blue chip receiver, Lloyd, was out. A solid 2nd-3rd round prospect that I could see developing into a Jay Fielder type in the NFL. Not necessarily flashy, but a consistently accurate, and winning quarterback.
By NFL War Room at The Sporting News
Overall: 7.2 NFL Comparison: Drew Brees, Chargers Strengths: Was a productive four-year starter. Shows good toughness and leadership ability. Is well built -- sturdy and thick but not tall. Has solid arm strength with a smooth release and good mechanics. Shows good touch on his deep ball, and can advance the ball downfield. Is quick in his set. Shows the ability to buy a second chance in the pocket. Throws well on the run. Is technically sound, and is a student of the game. Weaknesses: Lacks ideal height. Has some trouble finding the throwing lanes, and will have to move around to find the open receiver -- makes better reads when outside the pocket. Lacks great timing as a passer sometimes and occasionally will lose the strike zone. Needs to become more consistent. Does not have great speed, and is not a threat to run. Bottom line: Kittner is an experienced, adequately-armed quarterback with good intangibles. He doesn't have great height and is not a threat to run, but he will buy some extra chances in the pocket and has quick footwork. He studies film and is intelligent, but he will force some passes and tends to think his arm is stronger than it really is. In terms of productivity and leadership, Kittner is a gem; he just lacks first-round arm strength, speed and size.
By Brian DeLucia of FoxSports
Illinois' Kurt Kittner has been inconsistent at times, but shows the tools and pedigree to become a solid pro quarterback. He has a great mental approach to the game and was brought up in a good passing system under coach Ron Turner. He shows poise on the field and the ability to make quick reads. He sets up well in the pocket and can pick apart defenses within the intermediate areas with his timing and touch. His arm strength downfield is adequate, but he's more comfortable within the shorter areas. He could be a natural fit in a ball-control passing game and should develop into a team leader.
By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: Productive collegiate quarterback that has started since he was a true freshman. Second team All-Conference selection last year when he threw for 55.3%/2,994/23/13 after 58.2%/1,982/18/8 as a junior. MVP of the Micron PC Bowl during his sophomore campaign when his totals were 54.5%/2,702/24/5 for the year. THE GOOD: Tough, hard-nosed quarterback with great leadership skills. Sets up to throw with solid fundamentals displaying good footwork, ball positioning and poised under pressure. Patient, sees the field, going through receiver progressions and quick delivering the pass or getting the ball out of his hands. Takes what the defense gives him and does not make bad decisions under pressure. Sits in the pocket and gets hammered in order to get the pass off. Buys time for his receivers, reads the blitz, all along displaying the ability to get outside the tackle and throw on the move. Lacks the pinpoint accuracy but lays the pass into the open field and gives his receivers a chance to run to the ball. Intermediate throws display zip but overall cannot drive the ball downfield and under throws his deep targets. Not accurate passing on the run. THE BAD: Throws with a three-quarters delivery and has difficulty seeing over the line of scrimmage because of his height. Occasionally tosses the ball into coverage. A bit slow coming out of the gate at times and not always in tune with his receivers. Inconsistent all week at the Senior Bowl and really did nothing to distinguish himself or stand out amongst the crowd. THE SKINNY: Took well to coaching most of his college career, competitive and someone that can be successful at the next level if offered patience, guidance and asked to play within himself. Late Second Round.
By Dave Te Thomas at CBS SportsLine
ANALYSIS Positives: Durable passer with effective scrambling abilityÖHas good foot quickness, setting up with proper agility, base and balanceÖShows a strong arm snap, releasing the ball quicklyÖHas solid velocity on his short tosses, displaying good hip rotation while putting a tight spiral behind his tossesÖHas a good pocket presence, sensing when his protection is breaking down to step up and show patience while targeting his secondary receiversÖMakes good decisions reading defenses, showing good touch to deliver a catchable ballÖHas good huddle presence with cool demeanor in the pocketÖShows movement rolling out, working quickly to open throwing lanesÖHits receivers in stride, showing a good feel for routesÖSees on the move with the ability to adjust and has consistency throwing in tight spotsÖKnows how to look off and spot the secondary receiverÖWon't beat you scrambling, but has enough elusiveness to escapeÖEven though he has fine athletic ability, it is his field presence and winning mentality that makes him stand out above mostÖGreat character off the field (mother has multiple sclerosis and he travels home as much as he can to take care of her, no questions asked), the type you'd want your daughter to marry. Negatives: Has a tendency to throw into coverageÖMakes receivers work for the ball on deep routes as his passes tend to float in this areaÖGets a little jumpy at times in the pocket, but can connect throwing on the moveÖTends to stare down receivers a bit, but will make good decisionsÖBetter in the short to intermediate game, as his long ball just seems to dieÖThrows flat-footed at times and other times, he does revert to a æ release, but not often. CAREER NOTES The all-time winningest quarterback in school history (24 victories), his "never say die" attitude elevated his teammates to another levelÖHaving taken over the starting job midway through his freshman year, Kurt became the school's career-record holder with 70 touchdown passes, topping the previous mark of 55 by Jack Trudeau (1981-85)ÖGained 8722 yards on 682 of 1264 passes (54.0%)ÖOnly Trudeau (797) completed more passes in school annals and his 1264 attempts broke Trudeau's Illin record of 1245ÖHis 8722 yards passing was three shy of the school's all-time record of 8725 set by TrudeauÖHis 8880 yards in total offense broke Trudeau's old Illinois career-record of 8640. REMINDS YOU OFÖ Brian Griese, Denver Broncos. Like Griese, he knows how to rally his troops, but like Griese, he does tend to spend too much time eyeing his primary targets. He is not the most physically gifted of the crop and tends to underthrow when going long. GAZING INTO THE CRYSTAL BALLÖ The Illini have developed decent college quarter- backs in their time, but much like Jeff George and Tony Eason, you have to wonder if this kid will ever pan out at the next level. While some teams still have him targeted in the first three rounds, poor postseason efforts could see him slip into the second day.
By D.J. Boyer of Football.com
Strengths: Accuracy, Experience Weaknesses: Deep ball Assessment: Kittner may be the most polished quarterback in the draft, even ahead of Carr and Harrington when it comes to the overall package. But Kittner isn't dazzling and won't blow you away, he has a very limited upside but has very few weaknesses and is probably more ready to step in and lead a team than Carr and Harrington. Kittner is a very accurate passer and his mechanics and delivery are top-notch. Kittner started all 4 years at Illinois and it shows with his poise on the field. Always seem to throw a tight spiral and can buy enough time in the pocket to elude the rush. Kittner's main weakness is his deep ball, Kittner can throw the ball long but not with a lot of zip. Kittner will have to be weary of the free safety when throwing that ball into NFL coverage. Kittner could stand to put on about 10 pounds to his frame although he has already proven he is durable. Is a lock to be the 3rd or 4th quarterback taken in the draft and will go in the second round to a team like Kansas City or Chicago.
By STATS, Inc. at FoxSports
Kittner's greatest asset to a team will be the fact that he has been a starter in a pro-style offense for four years. He might be the most NFL ready quarterback in this year's draft. He is fundamentally sound with good mechanics and delivery. Kittner is a smart quarterback who knows how to read a defense. He is a three-step drop back passer, which should help him in a West Coast style offense. He has an above average arm but is not very good on the deep pass--he often underthrows his receivers on those routes. He is a little streaky as a passer and needs to work on being more accurate and consistent. Kittner is athletic and can buy some time with his feet, but he is not a scrambling quarterback. The big question with Kittner will be, has he maxed out his talent?
By Aaron Freeman of FalcFans.com
I like Kittner. He's a good passer. His arm strength is limited, but there are a lot of starters in the league that fit into the same category. Kittner has had poor off-season workouts which have definitely hurt him. He has good skills, and his accuracy is not as good as the top two prospects, but it's decent. Kittner would work best in a system where his limitations would be avoided, such as an offense that does not emphasize the vertical passing game. He's just not capable of making those passes. So then obviously, the West Coast comes to mind. His upside is good, but he is probably only worth a third round pick.
Click here to view Kittner's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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WR #3 - Kahlil Hill

Height: 6'2" Weight: 200 40 Time: 4.65
College: Iowa

By PFW at NFL Draft2002
Notes: Father, J.D., was a great receiver at Arizona State and the Bills' first-round pick (and a very early one) in 1971. Both father and son made their second seasons their best after down rookie years. Kahlil redshirted in 1997. He started every game in '98, when he caught 35 passes for 432 yards and two touchdowns and returned 18 kickoffs for 465 yards and one touchdown and 10 punts for 177 yards and two touchdowns. Returned both a kickoff (88 yards) and punt (62 yards) for scores in the '98 opener vs. Central Michigan. Was suspended in the fall of '99 for undisclosed reasons. Came back in 2000 to play in all 12 games and start 10. Caught 58-619-5 and returned 16 punts for 153 yards and 25 kickoffs for 680 yards and one touchdown. In '01, Hill caught 53-792-8 and returned 19 punts for 226 yards and 12 kickoffs for 313 yards. Won the Mosi Tatupu special-teams award in '01. Positives: Nice size. Very athletic. Fine balance, body control and jumping ability. Very well-coordinated. Quicker than fast but adjusts to the deep ball well and makes plays down the field. Good open-field runner and kickoff and punt returner. Can run excellent routes and get separation. Had a strong East-West Shrine game after standing out all week in practices as the best receiver on the field. Negatives: Was always a star and comes across as a pampered and spoiled player at times. Needs to improve his work habits, concentration and attention to detail. Rounds off too many of his pass routes. Lets you know when he is not the primary receiver. Lacks pure speed. Summary: A big, gifted athlete and receiver with return ability who can become a fine NFL player if he grows up and shows he will pay the price. However, if he tries to continue to play and practice the way he did in college, he will not realize his potential.
By NFL War Room at The Sporting News
Overall: 7.2 Strengths: Has unlimited potential. Is a tall and well-built. Has adequate speed, is deceptive. Shows good strength and the ability to make plays in traffic. Has ideal measurable skills for a possession receiver. Has more big-play flair than some realize. Is good at adjusting to the ball in the air, and shows solid body control. Weaknesses: Doesn't have good intangibles. Seems to be in the coach's doghouse constantly. Lack of concentration limits production. Was suspended in '99. Is inconsistent in routes. Will be sloppy at times and disappear in games, then is downright arrogant if he makes one play. Will drop passes. Catch the ball with body, but should be snatching and running. Needs to mature. Bottom line: Hill clearly has not reached his potential. He has excellent size, good strength and playmaking ability. He has outstanding talent and great upside, but he has a lot of mental lapses. Hill is from a tremendous blood line: His father, J.D., was a first-round pick of the Bills and older brother, Lenzell, a second-round pick of the Saints. Kahlil has the tools to be a solid NFL starter, but he must mature and become more consistent.
By Brian DeLucia of FoxSports
Iowa's Kahlil Hill is a very natural athlete with NFL bloodlines (his father and brother played in the league). He has a rangy frame and is very acrobatic at times, but needs to become a more consistent football player. At times, he shows a feel for setting up defenders and good quickness to separate out of his routes, but he must become a more consistent route runner. His toughness can be questioned at times when he short arms an occasional ball over the middle, but he can also make plays after the catch if he has an open lane underneath. He doesn't play to his natural speed on the football field on a consistent basis, but he shows the ability to make some plays downfield at times. He does snatch the ball out of the air very well at times due to his natural ball skills. At this point, he doesn't quite play up to his speed or pedigree as a wide receiver, but a good NFL position coach might be able to squeeze it out of him. In the beginning, he might be able to contribute as a kick returner.
By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: Productive receiver and starter at Iowa three of the last five years. Led the team in receiving as a senior with 53/792/14/8, also averaging 19/11.9/0 on punt returns and 12/26.1/0 returning kicks. Second to Kevin Kasper as a junior when he caught 58/619/10.7/5, averaging 16/9.6/0 returning punts and 25/27.2/1 on kick returns. Suspended from the team in 1999 after catching 35 passes as a red-shirt sophomore the prior year and averaging 18/25.9/1 returning kicks and 10/17.7/2 on punt returns. Father, J.D. Hill was a former first round pick for the Buffalo Bills, while brother Shelby was a top receiver for the Syracuse Orangemen in the early '90s. THE GOOD: Nice sized target that also impacts the game as a return specialist. Quick releasing off the line of scrimmage, comes back to the ball and extends for the high throws, making the tough grab in traffic. Adjusts well in mid air, reaches back to grab the errant throw and displays strong hands. Strong running after the catch and picks up extra yardage, traits he shows returning both punts and kicks. Runs well laterally catching the pass in stride and overall a fine athlete. THE BAD: Not always willing to lay out or expose himself in a crowd nor does he consistently win out in battles the way he is capable of. Not quick into his breaks, lacks deep speed and must be more consistent catching the ball with his hands. THE SKINNY: When focused a productive player that could be a second wide out for a team, doubling as a return specialist. Will have a long career if he dedicates himself but could also quickly be looking for a new line of work if he decides otherwise. Early fourth round.
By Dave Te Thomas at CBS SportsLine
ANALYSIS Positives: Has an athletic physique with a tight waist and hipsÖGets a quick burst off the snap and uses his hands well to challenge the defensive backs in press coverageÖHas very effective swim moves to release off the line, using his quick stuttersteps to shake off the cornerbacks to get to the second levelÖShows good field awareness in deep coverage, making proper body adjustments to come back for the ballÖExcels at keeping his feet inbounds near the sidelinesÖ Has that sudden burst that commands respect and knows how to set the defender up with his head fakes and change-of-direction agilityÖBig target who is very effective on crossing routesÖShows aggression competing for the ball and makes fluid adjustments going for the off-target passesÖAble to run, jump and extend for the ball with easeÖLowers his head and secures the ball firmly before heading upfieldÖWill position and get in the way of the defender as a blocker. Negatives: As the rock group, the Kinks sing, it's his attitude (poor, immature, pampered) that is a huge drawbackÖHas had off-field problems, resulting in a suspension in 1999 by the NCAAÖ Needs to show better movement working in tight coverageÖGets very sloppy running his routes, at timesÖWill gather and round his cutsÖWorks by his own set of rulesÖRelies too much on his exceptional speed, taking soft angle cuts and improper hip sink and swerveÖDoes not have natural hands, preferring to cradle the ball or catch with his bodyÖDespite his quickness, is rarely used on over-the-top routesÖNeeds to develop better shake moves in order to gain yardage after the catchÖPosition blocker, but prefers not to get too physical in this areaÖWhile well-liked by teammates, his work ethic leaves a lot to be desired and he looks like a high maintenance type, much like his father (J.D.) and brother (Shelby) wereÖHands (8 º-inches) are smaller than ideal. CAREER NOTES Versatile athlete with explosive accelerationÖThree-year starter at split end, who also excelled as a return specialistÖNamed the nation's best special teams performer in his final seasonÖ Caught at least one pass in 35 consecutive gamesÖRanks second on the school's career-record list with 152 receptions, topped only by Kevin Kasper (157, 1997-2000)ÖHis 1892 yards receiving rank sixth and his 15 touchdown grabs rank fifth in Iowa annalsÖReturned 58 kickoffs for a school career-record 1509 yards (26.0 avg), including two scores and gained 556 yards with a pair of touchdowns on 45 punt returns (12.4 avg)ÖFinished his career with 3963 all-purpose yards and 19 touchdowns. REMINDS YOU OFÖ Jerry Porter, Oakland Raiders. A world of talent who can simply control a game, if he wants to. Will look sensational one week and then, you'd need to put his face on a milk carton (missing) the next week. GAZING INTO THE CRYSTAL BALLÖ Based on his poor performance at the Combines, his idea of working out at a country club did not seem too wise. Still, you have to see what he can do between the white lines in some games. Yet, he will frustrate the hell out of you as he never strings back-to-back performances together as you'd expect from his talent level.
By D.J. Boyer of Football.com
Strengths: Return ability, Strength Weaknesses: Speed, Consistency Assessment: Kahlil Hill is a player who will be drafted higher based upon his ability as a return man and the receiving will be a bonus early in his career. What sets Hill apart is his vision, his vision is what allows him to be successful in return situations because he is one of the slower wide receivers available likely to be drafted. Hill played in a pro style at Iowa and put in a lot of extra time in the film and weight room. Hill doesn't have the breakaway speed to be a consistent big play threat. In fact consistency is an area where Hill could improve as well. I think Hill is one of the players who is drafted late that could turn into a steal and pan out.
By STATS, Inc. at FoxSports
Whoever drafts Hill needs to have a lot of patience. He is a physically gifted receiver who is still somewhat raw. Part of the reason he is still rough around the edges is because he missed the entire 1999 season due to a suspension. Another reason is he is extremely uncoachable. He is arrogant and doesn't get the whole team concept yet. He is tall with a good build and good speed. He has been used as both a kickoff and punt returner. When he is returning kicks, he looks much faster than as a receiver. Hill will go over the middle and will make big plays. He isn't very consistent, as he will drop passes and run bad routes. He is a body catcher, and that takes away from his speed. With his hands, he should be catching the ball better. Hill has all the skills needed to become a great receiver, but it is time for him to grow up and start listening to his coaches.
By Aaron Freeman of FalcFans.com
Hill has good size, and decent speed, but is not a deep threat. He projects well to a West Coast system in the NFL, because he works well on the short and intermediate routes. His hands are solid, if not great. He can make some plays after the catch due to his agility and running ability. But probably does more dancing than he needs to looking for the 80-yard gain, rather than settling for the 20-yarder. He is also a return specialist. His work ethic and character are questionable.
Click here to view Hill's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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WR #82 - Mike Coleman

Height: 5'11" Weight: 190 40 Time: 4.42
College: Widener

By PFW at NFL Draft2002
Notes: May be the top indoor and outdoor track-and-field athlete in the Middle Atlantic Conference, has competed in the Division III national championships and won All-America honors in track and field. Had 2001 bests of 6.2 seconds in the 55 meters, 10.6 in the 100 meters, 21.8 in the 200 meters, 23 feet-5 inches in the long jump and 49-5 in the triple jump. In football, had seven catches for 145 yards and no touchdowns as a true 18-year-old freshman and 31-634-11 as a sophomore. Became a standout in 2000, when he caught 46-1,274-18 during the regular season and completed 2-of-2 passes for 91 yards and a score. Also returned 15 kickoffs for 261 yards and no scores. If you include all of Widener's playoff games, Coleman caught 66-1,834-26, returned 24-438-0, threw for 91 yards and picked off a pass while filling in in the secondary in the playoffs. In '01, he caught 55-1,221-15 during the regular season. Positives: Good all-around athlete. Has big-league speed. Negatives: Has not faced much in the way of competition. Is often beating 5-9, 175-pound defensive backs with 4.8-4.9 speed. Does not always adjust to and catch the ball that well. At times looks like a track sprinter playing football relying on pure speed and not working hard enough to run and sell his routes. May be a little straight-linish and rarely shows quick cutting ability. At this level, he can run away from almost anyone, but it is a big jump from Division III to the NFL, and a lot of NFL defensive backs can match Coleman's speed. Summary: Right now, Coleman and teammate Jim Jones are huge fish in a tiny lake filled with minnows. But at first at the NFL level, they may feel like those minnows, and if they are not careful and prepared, they could get eaten alive very quickly.
Click here to view Coleman's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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T #72 - Kevin Shaffer

Height: 6'5" Weight: 298 40 Time: N/A
College: Tulsa

By PFW at NFL Draft2002
Notes: Did not play organized football until his junior year in high school. Lettered as a true freshman in 1998 at Tulsa and has started the past three years. Positives: Above-average to good size and size potential. Has started at left tackle in college. Above-average-to-good athlete who can shuffle and slide his feet and keep his feet moving upon contact. Has good change of direction. Uses hands well on pass protection. Understands blocking angles and position. Has improved a lot, and since he has just played six years of organized football and is 22, still has an upside. Negatives: Lacks functional strength and power. Has a hard time sinking his hips and anchoring and gets overpowered at times. Feet are good, but they may not be quick enough for him to be a left tackle in the NFL when you include the fact that he does not have really long arms. Lacks the bulk, lower-body power and tenacity teams look for in a right tackle. Does too much absorbing. Summary: Could surprise if he can learn to sink his hips and anchor and if he improves his play strength.
By Tony Pauline of TFY Draft Preview
STATS & BIO: Three-year starter that also saw extensive action as a true freshman. THE GOOD: Nice sized lineman with a good amount of upside potential. Blocks with forward lean, works hard and keeps the opponent in front of him. Strong in his upper body, fights with his hands and controls defenders once engaged in a block. Can shuffle and slide in pass protection and keeps his feet active. THE BAD: Not quick into his blocks or effective on the second level, lacks body adjustment and not light on his feet. Stiff, not a natural knee bender nor does he play with great balance. Needs to fill out physically and learn to use his size at all times to be effective at the next level. THE SKINNY: Could ultimately be placed inside at guard. Free Agent.
By STATS, Inc. at FoxSports
Shaffer is a good-sized prospect who is a mauler in the running game. Unfortunately, he isn't as good a pass blocker. He is a tough physical run blocker who will move the pile. He does a good job of getting under his defenders' pads. He has the ability to anchor and isn't easily bull rushed. He is not very quick out of his stance, which causes him to get out of position at times. He has short arms and often allows the defender to come to him instead of attacking his opponent. He doesn't have great footwork, and his short arms hurt in pass protection, as he can't force defenders wide.
Click here to view Shaffer's profile at AtlantaFalcons.com

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